Course Descriptions

Course Catalog

Courses are titled in the following style:

ART 260 Painting 3 cr. (2+4P)

The first number in the course prefix, Art 260, is 2 which indicates that the course is a sophomore course; the 3 cr. indicates the course is a 3-credit course. The 2+4P means that the class meets for two hours per week for recitation and/or lecture and also requires 4 hours per week of “practice” (laboratory or field work).

Course numbers indicate the class rank:

100-199 – Freshman courses

200-299 – Sophomore courses

The letter “N” will be added as a suffix to the course number when the course credits are not applicable to the bachelor’s degrees, associate’s degrees, or certificates. Some courses may be offered once a year and are identified accordingly.

Applied Statistics

Accounting

ACCT 200 A Survey of Accounting 3 cr.

Emphasis on financial statement interpretation and development of accounting information for management. For engineering, computer science, and other non-business majors. Prerequisite: one C S course or consent of instructor. Community Colleges only.

ACCT 251 Management Accounting 3 cr.

Development and use of accounting information for management decision making.

ACCT 252 Financial Accounting 3 cr.

Interpretation and use of financial accounting information for making financing, investing, and operating decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 251 strongly suggested.

Aerospace Studies

AERO 000 Air Force Leadership Laboratory 0-99 cr. (2P)

Progressive study and application of Air Force customs, courtesies, drill, ceremonies, military commands, and evaluating these skills. Cadets plan and control the military activities of the cadet corps, prepare and present briefings, motivate, and increase the performance of other cadets. Mandatory each semester for cadets pursuing a commission.

AERO 121 The Air Force Today I 1 cr. (1+2P)

Survey course on the USAF and AFROTC. Includes mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, as well as basic communication skills. Leadership Lab practicum, AERO 000 is included.

AERO 122 The Air Force Today II 1 cr. (1+2P)

Continuation of AERO 121, with emphasis on Air Force officer opportunities, group leadership problems, and further development of communication skills (oral and written). Includes Leadership Lab practicum, AERO 000.

AERO 221 The Air Force Way I 1 cr. (1+2P)

Topics include: Air Force heritage, Air Force leaders, an introduction to ethics and values, and an application of communication skills. Facilitates the transition from Air Force ROTC cadet to Air Force ROTC candidate. Includes Leadership Lab practicum, AERO CIOD.

AERO 222 The Air Force Way II 1 cr. (1+2P)

Continuation of AERO 221, including an introduction to leadership, quality Air Force, and continued application of communication skills. Includes Leadership Lab practicum, AERO 000.

Anthropology

ANTH 115 Native Peoples of North America 3 cr.

General survey of the ethnology of selected native American groups.

ANTH 118 Introduction to Historic Preservation 3 cr.

Introduction to historic preservation, its history, goals, methods, legal basis, and economic importance. Explores public role in decision-making. Community Colleges only.

ANTH 120G Human Ancestors 3 cr.

Evolutionary history of the human species from its origin in the primate order, with primary emphasis on the evolution of humankind during the past three million years. Examination of the social lives of apes and consideration of similarities to and differences from them. Biological foundations of human behavior, emphasizing thought, movement, and interaction.

ANTH 125G Introduction to World Cultures 3 cr.

Introductory survey of anthropological studies of human thought and behavior in different world cultures, covering social, cultural, economic, political, and religious practices and beliefs.

ANTH 201G Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr.

Exploration of human origins and the development of cultural diversity. Topics include biological and cultural evolution, the structure and functions of social institutions, belief systems, language and culture, human-environmental relationships, methods of prehistoric and contemporary cultural analysis, and theories of culture.

ANTH 297 Elementary Special Topics 1-4 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Art

ART 101G Orientation in Art 3 cr.

A multicultural examination of the principles and philosophies of the visual arts and the ideas expressed through them.

ART 110G Visual Concepts 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to the philosophies of art, visual thinking, and principles of visual organization. Designed to give students a broad view of aesthetic traditions, ideologies, and techniques basic to the creation and evaluation of art. Principles and concepts are taught in a common lecture and applied in parallel small studio sections. For non-art majors only.

ART 150 Drawing I 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to the skill of seeing through exercises that emphasize careful drawing from the still life and utilize a range of drawing materials and techniques. Outside assignments required.

ART 151 Drawing II 3 cr. (2+4P)

Continued emphasis on drawing from observation by focusing on still life and other subject matter. Covers a range of materials, techniques, and concepts. Outside assignments. Prerequisite: ART 150. Restricted to Art and CMI majors.

ART 155 2-D Fundamentals 3 cr.

Introduction to two-dimensional space emphasizing visual elements and design principles as they apply to composition. A variety of materials are used in the studio projects and sketchbook exercises. Developing knowledge in vocabulary, color theory, and skill in translating ideas into design are encouraged.

ART 156 3-D Fundamentals 3 cr.

Compositional organization of three-dimensional space explored through a broad range of visual exercises. Resourceful and creative problem solving encouraged.

ART 157 Color Theory 3cr. (2+4P)

Various color theories as they relate to compositional organization. Required for art education majors.

ART 160 Computer-Based Illustration 3cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to the principles of computerized drawing and design. Using the basic concepts, drawing tools, and vocabulary of Adobe Illustrator. Prerequisite: ART 150, ART 155, or consent of instructor.

ART 161 Digital Imaging I 3 cr. (2+4P)

Work with basic concepts, tools, and vocabulary of Adobe Photoshop to create effective visual communication. Includes selection tools, cloning, copying and pasting, color correction, image restoration, filters, and special effects. Community Colleges only.

ART 163 Digital Graphics 3 cr. (2+4P)

Importing and exporting images and text into various desktop publishing formats. Exploring imaging, drawing, and page layout applications. Introduction to typography. Prerequisite: ART 161.

ART 165 Web Page Design 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to the creation of well-designed and organized Web sites. Emphasis on building creative but functional user-friendly sites. Introduction to HTML, Flash, Java Script, and Web-authoring software. Prerequisite: ART 161. Community Colleges only. Same as OEPT 165.

ART 250 Drawing III 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to intensive drawing from the figure with a focus on observation. Outside assignments may be required. Prerequisite: ART 151 (for art majors) or ART 155.

ART 252 Aspects of Drawing 2-3 cr.

Continued work in drawing with emphasis on personal creative endeavor. Prerequisites: ART 150, ART 151, and ART 250. Community Colleges only.

ART 256 Introduction to Letter Forms and Typographic Design 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to letter forms, typography, and identity marks. Projects produced using conventional and digital graphic designer tools. Prerequisite(s): ART 155

ART 260 Introduction to Painting 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to basic skills of painting through various exercises that emphasize working from observation.

ART 261 Painting Methods, Techniques and Applications 3 cr. (2+4P)

The investigation of formal aspects of painting, an examination of painting techniques, and an exploration of various methodologies regarding form and content as applied to critical thinking skills through medium of paint. Prerequisites: ART 150, ART 260.

ART 262 Aspects of Painting 2-3 cr.

Varied painting media: continued development of painting skills. Prerequisites: ART 150, ART 155 (for art majors), ART 260, or consent of instructor.

ART 265 Sculpture I, A-Introduction to Sculpture: Process and Possibility 3 cr. (2+4P)

A series of interpretive assignments incorporating such processes as mold making, welding, and woodworking. Creative problem solving and visual thinking skills emphasized. Examples of contemporary sculpture regularly presented and discussed.

ART 267 Art Portfolio Preparation 3cr. (2+4P).

Refine general marketing strategies, personal portfolio and resumes. Define, target, and penetrate personal target markets. Students develop individual promotional packages. Prerequisites: ART 163, ART 269, and ART 272, or consent of instructor.

ART 268 Desktop Publishing II 3cr. (2+4P)

Advanced principles of typography and page layout. Combining multiple images and text from different applications; study of pre-press preparation and image readiness for separations and for the service bureaus. Prerequisite: ART 163.

ART 269 Advanced Computer-Based Illustration 3cr. (2+4P)

Design custom graphics and create special effects with filtering, special effects on type, graphing, technical illustrations, and three-dimensional drawing using Adobe Illustrator. Prerequisites: ART 157, ART 160, and ART 161, or consent of instructor.

ART 270 Introduction to Photography 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to photography with digital cameras. Basic camera operation, picture composition, image processing, and digital workflow. Image culture and the role of the still, lens-made image in contemporary society. Students must come equipped with an appropriate laptop computer, software and digital camera (consult with instructor).

ART 271 Introduction to Film and Darkroom 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to silver based photographic materials film development, enlargement printing and darkroom work. Students will work with a range of cameras including: medium format, toy and pinhole. Emphasis on understanding the syntax of silver halide photographic materials. Development of conceptual vocabulary and the creation of images with thematic unity. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): ART 270

ART 272 Digital Imaging II 3 cr. (2+4P)

Refining of individual creative styles and technical skills using Adobe Photoshop. Emphasis on input and output predictability and working with large file productions. Community Colleges only. Prerequisites: ART 161. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

ART 275 Ceramics I, A 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to clay arts. Techniques of handbuilding, wheel throwing, and glazing.

ART 276 Ceramics I, B 3 cr. (2+4P)

Beginning ceramics, complementary half to ART 275. (ART 275 and ART 276 do not need to be taken consecutively.) Basic building techniques of coil, slab, and throwing are introduced. High-fire and low-fire clays are used.

ART 277 Introduction to Film and Darkroom 3 cr. (2+4P)

Introduction to silver based photographic materials film development, enlargement printing and darkroom work. Students will work with a range of cameras including: medium format, toy and pinhole. Emphasis on understanding the syntax of silver halide photographic materials. Development of conceptual vocabulary and the creation of images with thematic unity. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): ART 270

ART 280 Printmaking I 3 cr. (2+4P)

Varied media in printmaking and compositional problems.

ART 281 Printmaking II 3 cr. (2+4P)

Printmaking materials and techniques, with emphasis in intaglio and relief procedures. Prerequisites: ART 150, ART 156 (for art majors) and 280. Corequisite: ART 150.

ART 294 Special Topics in Studio 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects and credits to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. No more than 9 credits toward a degree. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ART 295G Introduction to Art History I 3 cr.

An introduction to the principles of art history within a chronological framework of the art of the Western World. All media will be discussed. From prehistoric times to the fourteenth century.

ART 296G Introduction to Art History II 3 cr.

Continuation of ART 295. Art of the Western World from Late Gothic to the Rococo.

ART 297 Introduction to Art History III 3 cr.
Continuation of ART 296. Art of the Western World from the Enlightenment to the present.

Astronomy

ASTR 105G The Planets 4 cr. (3+2P)

Comparative study of the planets, moons comets, and asteroids which comprise the solar system. Emphasis on geological and physical processes which shape the surfaces and atmospheres of the planets. Laboratory exercises include analysis of images returned by spacecraft. Intended for non-science majors, but some basic math required.
This lecture/lab satisfies the New Mexico Common Core Area III: Lab Sciences requirement.

ASTR 110G Introduction to Astronomy 4 cr. (3+2P)

A survey of the universe. Observations, theories, and methods of modern astronomy. Topics include planets, stars and stellar systems, black holes and neutron stars, supernovas and gaseous nebulae, galaxies and quasars, and cosmology. Emphasis on physical principles involving gravity, light, and optics (telescopes). Generally non-mathematical. Laboratory involves use of the campus observatory and exercises designed to experimentally illustrate principles of astronomy. This lecture/lab course satisfies the New Mexico Common Core Area III: Lab Sciences requirement.

ASTR 210 The Search for Extraterrestrial Life 3 cr.

Recent discoveries concerning life within the Solar System are discussed and generalized to other star systems. Current space travel and interstellar communication efforts are reviewed.

Automotive Technology

AUTO 103 Auto Mechanics Fundamentals 4 cr. (2+4P)

Theory and operation of all areas of auto mechanics. Basic repair and maintenance operations.

AUTO 112 Basic Gasoline Engines 5 cr. (2+6P)

Principles of gasoline engine operation. Identification, design, function of engine components; engine disassembly and reassembly; trouble shooting and rebuilding heads.

AUTO 117 Electronic Analysis and Tune-Up of Gasoline Engines 5 cr. (2+6P)

Theory and operation of ignition and emission control systems and fuel system. Use of troubleshooting equipment and diagnostic equipment. Prerequisite: AUTO 120 or consent of the instructor.

AUTO 120 Electrical Systems 4 cr. (2+4P)

Troubleshooting and repair of starters, alternators, and associated circuits. Reading electrical diagrams, diagnosis and repair of electrical accessories. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

AUTO 295 Special Topics 1-6 cr.

Topics to be announce in the Schedule of Classes.

Business Administration

B A 104 Introduction to Business 3 cr.

Survey and integration of functions in business organizations within their social and economic environment. Community Colleges only.

B A 202 Small Business Enterprise 3 cr.

Appraisal of business functions within the framework of a small business organization.

Business Computer Information Systems

BCIS 110 Introduction to Computerized Information Systems 3 cr.

Computerized information systems, their economic and social implications. Introduction to microcomputer hardware, personal productivity software, and communications.

BCIS 122 Introduction to Information Systems Programming 3 cr.

Includes basic computer algorithms in current programming environments and the Java programming language. Prerequisites: C or better in BCIS 110 or C S 110; and Math 120.

Biology

BIOL 101G Human Biology 3 cr.

Introduction to modern biological concepts. Emphasis on relevance to humans and their relationships with their environment. Cannot be taken for credit after successful completion of BIOL 111G or BIOL 211G. Corequisite: BIOL 101L.

BIOL 101GL Human Biology Laboratory 1 cr. (3P)

Laboratory for BIOL 101G. Laboratory experiences and activities exploring biological concepts and their relevance to humans and their relationship with their environment. Corequisite: BIOL 101G.

BIOL 111G Natural History of Life 3 cr.

Survey of major processes and events in the genetics, evolution, and ecology of microbes, plants and animals, and their interactions with the environment. Appropriate for non-science majors. Must be taken with BIOL 111L to meet general education requirements.

BIOL 111GL Natural History of Life Laboratory 1 cr. (3P)

Laboratory experiments, demonstrations and exercises on interrelationships among organisms, biodiversity, processes of evolution, and interaction of organisms and their environment. Corequisite: BIOL 111G.

BIOL 211G Cellular and Organismal Biology 3 cr. (3P)

Principles of cellular structure and function, genetics, and physiology of microbes, plants, and animals. Suitable for non-majors with sufficient chemistry. Must be taken with BIOL 211L to meet general education requirements. Pre/Corequisites: CHEM 110G or CHEM 111G.

BIOL 211GL Cellular and Organismal Biology Laboratory 1 cr. (3P)

Laboratory demonstrations, experiments and exercises on molecular and cellular biology and organismal physiology. Must have passed BIOL 211G or be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 211G and BIOL 211GL. Corequisites: either CHEM 110G or CHEM 111G.

BIOL 221 Introductory Microbiology 3 cr. (3P)

Principles of isolation, taxonomy, and physiology of microorganisms. Prerequisites: CHEM 112G, equivalent or consent of instructor. Corequisite: BIOL 221L. Community Colleges only.

BIOL 221L Introductory Microbiology Laboratory 1 cr. (3P)

A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 221 or 219. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 or BIOL 219 or concurrent enrollment.

BIOL 222 Zoology 3 cr. (2+3P)

Structure, function, and survey of animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 111G and BIOL 111L, or BIOL 190, and at least sophomore standing. Community Colleges only.

BIOL 225 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 cr. (3+3P)

The first in a two-course sequence that covers the structure and function of the human body, including terminology of the human gross anatomy, chemistry overview, cell structure, cell physiology (including DNA, protein synthesis and cell division). The organization of cells and tissues and their metabolic and homeostatic processes and regulation are also covered. Physical and chemical operation of organs and systems of the human body include the integumentary skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Community Colleges only.

BIOL 226 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 cr. (3+3P)

The second in a two-course sequence that covers the structure and function of the human body. Includes the physical and chemical operation of the organs and systems of the human body, including endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproduction system. Concepts of nutrition, metabolism, energy, fluid and electrolyte balance, heredity, pregnancy and human embryonic and fetal development are also covered. Prerequisites: BIOL 225. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

BIOL 250 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Community Colleges only.

BIOL 253 Human Anatomy 4 cr. (3+3P)

Detailed presentations of human anatomy, with laboratory. Prerequisites: Grade of C in BIOL 190 or BIOL 211G and either CHEM 111G or CHEM 110G. For Nursing, Pre-Nursing, and Human Nutrition and Food Science majors only.

BIOL 254 Human Physiology 3 cr.

Physical and chemical operation of the organs and systems of the human body. Not open to students who have passed BIOL 354 or BIOL 381. Prerequisites: BIOL 190 or BIOL 211G; BIOL 211L; CHEM 111G or CHEM 110G.

BIOL 254L Human Physiology Laboratory 1 cr. (3P)

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 254. BIOL 254 must be taken concurrently or in an earlier semester. Community Colleges only.

BIOL 260 Human Genetics 3 cr.

Human genetics for science and non-science majors. Major topics include cell division, transmission genetics, single gene effects, sex-linked inheritance, cytogenetics, DNA structure and replication, gene expression, and recombinant DNA technology. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 111G or BIOL 211G.

BIOL 260L Human Genetics Laboratory 1 cr. (3P)

Laboratory course to accompany BIOL 260. Corequisite: BIOL 260.

Business Law

BLAW 230 Business Law 3 cr.

Introduction to law in general and application to business specifically; comprehensive study of the law of contracts; and the principal and agent relationship. Offered at all NMSU branch campuses except Dona Ana Community College. Credit may not be earned in both BLAW 230 and BLAW 317.

Business Management

Consult with an Academic Advisor regarding courses that have different prefixed/course numbers but the same course titles as they are often considered duplications. BMGT courses are taught at the Community Colleges only.

BMGT 110 Introduction to Business 3 cr.

Terminology and concepts of the business field. Role of accounting, computers, business management, finance, labor, and international business in our society. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 112 Principles of Banking 3 cr.

Banking in today’s economy: language and documents of banking, check processing, teller functions, deposit function, trust services, bank bookkeeping, loans, and investments. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 140 Principles of Supervision I 3 cr.

Principles of supervision emphasizing planning, organization, rating of employees and procedures to develop good morale. Introduction to interpretation of case studies. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 150 Income Taxation 3 cr.

Federal income taxation of individuals, sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, trusts, and estates with particular reference to CLU, life insurance and annuities. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 205 Customer Service in Business 3 cr.

Establishes concepts of service quality in relationship to business success and maximization of returns to the organization. Explores techniques for delivering quality and service in a variety of business settings. Restricted to: Community Colleges.

BMGT 210 Marketing 3 cr.

Role of marketing in economy, types of markets, product development, distribution channels, pricing, promotion of goods, market research, consumer motivation, and management of marketing process. Prerequisite: BMGT 110. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 216 Business Math 3 cr.

Application of basic mathematical procedures to business situations, including percentage formula applications, markup, statement analysis, simple and compound interest, and annuities. Prerequisite: CCDM 103N or satisfactory math score on ACT. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 221 Cooperative Experience I 1-3 cr.

Student employed in approved work site; supervised and rated by employer and instructor. Each credit requires specified number of hours of on-the-job work experience. Consent of instructor required. Graded S/U. Restricted to: Community Colleges. Restricted to BMGT majors.

BMGT 232 Personal Finance 3 cr.

Budgeting, saving, credit, installment buying, insurance, buying vs. renting a home, income tax statement preparation, investment, and estate disposal through will and trust. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 240 Human Relations 3 cr.

Human interactions in business and industrial settings. Motivation and learning experiences as related to problems of the worker and supervisor. Practical applications of human behavior. Prerequisite: CCDE 105N or higher or BOT 105 or higher. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 245 Bank Investments 3 cr.

Covers nature of bank investments, relationship of investment management to other functional areas of the bank, and factors that affect investment strategies and decisions. Prerequisite: BMGT 112 or consent of instructor. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 255 Special Topics II 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 264 Real Estate Law 3 cr.

This course is a requirement for licensure in real estate for the state of New Mexico. Topics covered include; ownership of real estate, real estate brokerage relationships, contracts, environmental concerns and federal laws that affect real estate. These topics are requirements of the New mexico Real Estate Commission. Restricted to: Community Colleges only. Crosslisted with PL S 264.

BMGT 275 Small Business Planning 3-4 cr.

How to start a small business based on a formal business plan. Includes feasibility study and legal requirements. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 277 Small Business Management 3 cr.

Study of the principles, advantages, and problems of owning or operating a small business. Location, capital, marketing, control, and sales promotion. Prerequisite(s): BMGT 110. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 280 Introduction to Human Resources 3 cr.

Personnel functions encompassing job analysis, recruitment, selection, training, appraisals, discipline, and terminations. Prerequisite(s): BMGT 110. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

BMGT 298 Independent Study 1-3 cr.

Individual studies directed by consenting faculty with prior approval of department chair. Maximum of 6 credits may be earned. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing with 3.0 GPA. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

Business Office Technology

BOT 101 Keyboarding Basics 3 cr. (2+2P)

Covers correct fingering and mastery of the keyboard to develop skillful operation. Formatting basic business letters, memos, and manuscripts.

BOT 102 Keyboarding: Document Formatting 3 cr. (2+2P)

Designed to improve keyboarding speed and accuracy; introduce formats of letters, tables and reports. A speed and accuracy competency requirement must be met. Prerequisite: BOT 101 or consent of instructor.

BOT 106 Business Mathematics 3 cr. (2+2P)

Mathematical applications for business, including training in the touch method of the 10-key calculator. Prerequisite: CCDM 103N or adequate score on math placement exam.

BOT 110 Records Management 3 cr.

Principles, methods and procedures for the selection, operation and control of manual and automated records systems.

BOT 150 Medical Terminology 3 cr.

Understanding of the basic elements of medical words. Use of medical abbreviations. Same as NURS 150 and OEHO 120.

BOT 202 Keyboarding Document Production 3 cr. (2+2P)

Further development of keyboarding speed and accuracy. Production of complex letters, memos, tables, reports and business forms. A speed and accuracy competency requirement must be met. Prerequisite: BOT 102 and BOT 109, or consent of instructor.

BOT 203 Office Equipment and Procedures I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Office organization, telephone techniques, equipment and supplies, handling meetings, human relations, mail procedures, and travel. Prerequisite: BOT 213 or C S 110 or consent of instructor.

BOT 204 Office Equipment and Procedures II 3cr. (2+2P)

A continuation of BOT 203 with advanced study of office practices. Prerequisites: BOT 203. Corequisite: BOT 209, COMM 253G/265G or consent of instructor.

BOT 205 Microcomputer Accounting I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Introduction to automated accounting systems on microcomputers. Prerequisites: working knowledge of computers and accounting or consent of instructor.

BOT 206 Microcomputer Accounting II 3 cr. (2+2P)

Microcomputer accounting applications, integrating spreadsheets, word processing, graphics, and database. Prerequisites: BOT 121 and OECS 215, or consent of instructor.

BOT 207 Machine Transcription 3 cr. (2+2P)

Creating office documents using transcribing equipment and microcomputer software. Emphasis on proofreading, editing and grammar. Prerequisites: minimum keyboarding of 45 wpm and a C or better in BOT 105 or BOT 109 or equivalent and BOT 211 or BOT 213.

BOT 208 Medical Office Procedures 3 cr. (2+2P)

Records and procedures as applicable to medical offices. Prerequisites: BOT 109, BOT 211, and OEHO 120.

BOT 209 Business and Technical Communications 3 cr.

Effective written communication skills and techniques for career success in the work place. Composition of letters, memos, short reports, forms, and proposals, and technical descriptions and directions. Prerequisites: ENGL 111G and computer keyboarding ability or consent of instructor.

BOT 211 Information Processing I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Defining and applying fundamental information processing concepts and techniques using the current version of leading software. Prerequisite: Keyboarding proficiency as demonstrated through completion of BOT 122, BOT 123, and BOT 124 or BOT 101 or equivalent. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits under different subtitles listed in the Schedule of Classes.

BOT 213 Word Processing I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Operation and function of a word processor. Specific equipment to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: BOT 101 or keyboarding proficiency as demonstrated through completion of BOT 122, BOT 123, and BOT 124 or equivalent.

BOT 214 Word Processing II 3 cr. (2+2P)

Advanced operation and functions of a word processor. Specific equipment to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisites: BOT 213 or consent of instructor.

BOT 220 Internship in Business Office Technology 2 cr.

Experience in a supervised office position. Student must work at least eight hours per week. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits.

BOT 223 Medical Transcription I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Introductory machine transcription for the medical office using medical terminology. Prerequisites: NURS 150 or OEHO 120 or BOT 150, and BIOL101G/L or and OEHO 100 or consent of instructor.

BOT 225 Medical Transcription II 3 cr. (2+2P)

Study of machine transcription for the medical office using medical terminology. Continuation of BOT 223. Prerequisite: BOT 223.

BOT 228 Medical Insurance Billing 3 cr.

Overview of the insurance specialists role and responsibilities. Emphasis on diagnostic and procedural coding and the claims processing cycle. Prerequisites: NURS 150 or OEHO 120 or BOT 150 and OEHO 100 or BIOL 101G/L and BOT 208 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

BOT 239 Personal Development 3 cr.

Development of a marketable, employable office systems person, to include interview, voice, manners, and apparel.

BOT 249 CPT Coding I 3 cr.

Introductory coding class for the medical office using the CPT coding conventions and principles. Prerequisite: NURS 150 or OEHO 120 or BOT 150 and OEHO 100 or BIOL 101G/L.

BOT 255 Special Topics 1-4 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

BOT 259 CPT Coding II 3 cr.

Continuation of BOT 249. Emphasis on the most recent versions of CPT coding. In depth study of CPT coding conventions and principles. Designed as a medical coding capstone course. Prerequisite: BOT 249.

Business Administration and Economics

BUSA 111 Business in a Global Society 3 cr.

Overview of the global environment of business and the development of business as an integrative, cross-disciplinary activity. Prerequisite: BCIS 110 or C S 110 or concurrent enrollment.

Civil Engineering

C E 233 Mechanics-Statics 3 cr.

Engineering mechanics using vector methods. Prerequisites: MATH 192G and cumulative GPA of 2.0. Corequisite: PHYS 215G.

Counseling and Educational Psychology

C EP 110G Human Growth and Behavior 3 cr.

Introduction to the principles of human growth and development throughout the life span.

C EP 210 Educational Psychology 3 cr.

Psychological foundations as they apply to the learner in the classroom setting.

Criminal Justice

C J 101G Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 cr.

Examination of crime and justice within the broader social and cultural context of U.S. society from interdisciplinary social science perspectives. Includes critical analysis of criminal justice processes and the ethical, legal, and political factors affecting the exercise of discretion by criminal justice professionals.

C J 199 Special Topics in Criminal Justice 1 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of 6 credits.

C J 205 Criminal Law I 3 cr.

Rules, principles, and doctrines of criminal liability in the United States. The historical development, limits, and functions of the substantive criminal law.

C J 206 Criminal Law II 3 cr.

Legal problems associated with the investigation of crime. Commencement of criminal proceedings, prosecution and defense of charges, sentencing and appeal. Prerequisite: C J 205. Community Colleges only. (Note: students completing C J 206 may not take C J 306.)

C J 210 The American Law Enforcement System 3 cr.

Historical and philosophical foundations of law and order. An in-depth examination of the various local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.

C J 221 Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation 3 cr.

Investigation procedures from crime scene searches, collection of evidence, and case preparation. Community Colleges only. (Note: students completing C J 221 may not take C J 321.)

C J 230 Introduction to Corrections 3 cr.

Development of correctional philosophy, theory, and practice. Institutional and non-institutional alternatives available in the corrections process.

C J 250 Courts and the Criminal Justice System 3 cr.

Structures and functions of American courts. Roles of attorneys, judges, and other court personnel; operation of petit and grand juries, trial and appellate courts.

C J 293 Field Experience in Criminal Justice 3 – 6 cr.

Field experience in a public criminal justice agency or equivalent private sector organization. Supervised internship experience, conferences, and observations. Prerequisites: C J 101G, prior arrangement and consent of instructor and a GPA of 2.0 or better in major. Restricted to majors. Community Colleges only.

Computer Science

C S 110 Computer Literacy 3 cr.

Evolution and application of computers; economic and social implications; introduction to programming on microcomputers.

C S 167 C Programming 3 cr. (2+2P)

Programming in the C language. Prerequisite: Math 121G.

C S 171G Introduction to Computer Science 4 cr. (3+2P)

Computers are now used widely in all areas of modern life. This course provides understanding of the theoretical and practical foundations for how computers work, and provides practical application and programming experience in using computers to solve problems efficiently and effectively. The course covers broad aspects of the hardware, software, and mathematical basis of computers. Weekly labs stress using computers to investigate and report on data-intensive scientific problems. Practical experience in major software applications includes an introduction to programming, work processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, and Internet applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 120.

C S 177 C++ Programming 3 cr. (2+2P)

Introduction to object-oriented programming in the C++ language. Prerequisite: C S 167 or previous programming experience in C or consent of instructor.

C S 187 Java Programming 3 cr. (2+2P)

Programming in the Java language. Prerequisite: MATH 121G. Same as BCIS 122.

C S 209 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

May be repeated for maximum of 12 credits.

C S 272 Introduction to Data Structures 4 cr. (3+2P)

Design, implementation, use of fundamental abstract data types and their algorithms: lists, stacks, queues, deques, trees; imperative and declarative programming. Internal sorting; time and space efficiency of algorithms. Prerequisites: at least a C in C S 172.

COMMUNITY COLLEGE DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES

When the letter “N” is added as a suffix to the course number, the course credits are not applicable to bachelor’s or associate’s degrees or certificates. The CCD courses are only offered on the branch campuses.

Community College – Development English

CCDE 105N Effective Communication Skills 4 cr. (3+2P)

Instruction and practice in basic communication, to include written and oral presentations. Develops thinking, writing, speaking, reading, and listening skills necessary for successful entry to college and university classes. Provides laboratory. RR applicable.

CCDE 110N General Composition 4 cr. (3+2P)

Instruction and practice in preparation for college-level writing. Students will develop and write short essays. Provides laboratory. Prerequisite: CCDE 105N (C or better) or equivalent. RR applicable.

Community College – Developmental Mathematics

CCDM 100N Mathematics Preparation for College Success 1-4 cr.

Mathematics skills course designed for college students with math skills insufficient for success in CCDM 103N. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. RR applicable.

CCDM 103N Pre-Algebra 4 cr. (3+2P)

Fundamental mathematics operations and arithmetic computations. Introduction to algebra and applied geometry. Provides laboratory and individualized instruction. RR applicable.

CCDM 105N Mathematics Preparation and Pre-Algebra 5 cr. (4+2P)

A total immersion course that combines CCDM 100N and CCDM 103N using tutorials, manipulatives, and classroom instruction. Completion of this class is equivalent to the completion of CCDM 100N and CCDM 103N. Prerequisite(s): Math Placement Exam. Restricted to: Community colleges.

CCDM 112N Developmental Algebra 1 4 cr. (3+2P)

Fundamental algebra operations, variable expressions, solving linear equations, applications of linear equations, polynomials and factoring. Provides laboratory and individualized instruction. Completion of CCDM 112N and CCDM 113N is equivalent to completion of CCDM 114N. Graded: Traditional with RR. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CCDM 103N or equivalent. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

CCDM 113N Developmental Algebra II 4 cr. (3+2P)

Continuation of CCDM 112N. Completion of CCDM 113N meets basic skills requirement. Completion of CCDM 112N and CCDM 113 N is equivalent to completion of CCDM 114N. Graded: Traditional with RR. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in CCDM 112N or consent of instructor. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

CCDM 114N Algebra Skills 4 cr. (3+ 2P)

Fundamental algebra operations: algebraic expressions, solving linear equations, factoring, radicals, exponents. Provides laboratory and individualized instruction. Completion of CCDM 114N meets basic skills requirement. Prerequisite(s): C or better in CCDM 103N. Restricted to: Community colleges.

Community College – Developmental Reading

CCDR 105N Fundamentals of Academic Reading 3 cr. (2+2P)

Fundamentals of academic reading skills. Emphasis on vocabulary development and text comprehension through literature based instruction. Course earns institutional credit but will not count towards degree requirements. Graded: Traditional with RR. Prerequisite(s): COMPASS score of 60 or less on reading section. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

CCDR 110N Effective College Reading 3 cr. (2+2P)

Provides a variety of strategies for effective reading and studying at the college level. Emphasis on reading across disciplines. Course earns institutional credit but will not count towards degree requirements. Graded: Traditional with RR. Prerequisite(s): COMPASS score of 64 on reading section. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

Community College – Developmental Studies

CCDS 104N Comprehensive Reading Development 4 cr. (3+2P)

Integration of basic reading skills, including vocabulary development, text comprehension, and critical reading skills. RR applicable.

CCDS 108N Effective Reading 4 cr. (3+2P)

Instruction and practice of skills and strategies for effective reading at the college level. Designed to incorporate applied skill practice lab activities. RR applicable.

CCDS 109N Study Skills for Reading 1-3 cr.

Individualized reading skill strategies necessary for success in college classroom. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. Graded traditional or S/U.

CCDS 111N Study Skills for Math 1-3 cr.

Individualized study skill strategies necessary for success in the math classroom. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

CCDS 113N Study Skills for English 1-3 cr.
Individualized study skill strategies necessary for success in the composition classroom. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Chemistry

Credit may not be received for any chemistry course which covers the same general subject material but is at a lower level than the course for which credit has already been earned. (For example: CHEM 110G after CHEM 111G, CHEM 211G after CHEM 313,etc.)

CHEM 110G Principles and Applications of Chemistry 4 cr. (3+3P)

A survey of the properties and uses of the elements and their compounds. In addition to classical chemistry, attention is paid to the materials from which consumer products are made, to the production of energy, and to environmental considerations. Prerequisite: 3 years of high school math or CCDM 114N.

CHEM 111G General Chemistry I 4 cr. (3+3P)

Descriptive and theoretical chemistry. Prerequisites: (1) grade of C or better in MATH 120 or a Mathematics Placement Exam Score adequate to enroll in mathematics courses beyond MATH 120; and (2) one of the following; B or better in a second semester high school chemistry course, or a grade of at least C in CHEM 100, or an enhanced ACT score of at least 22. CHEM 111G/112G are General Education alternative to CHEM 110G.

CHEM 112G General Chemistry II 4 cr. (3+3P)

Descriptive and theoretical chemistry. CHEM 111G/112G are General Education alternative to CHEM 110G.

CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry 4 cr. (3+3P)

A one-semester survey for students requiring a brief coverage of important classes of organic compounds. Prerequisites: CHEM 112G or CHEM 114.

Creative Media Technologies

CMT 115 Digital Photography and Imaging I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Principles and techniques of photography using digital equipment with an emphasis on lighting, focus, and composition.

CMT 130 Introduction to Web Design 3 cr. (2+2P)

Introduction to web development techniques, theory, and design. Incorporates HTML and industry-standard web editing software in developing various web sites. Community Colleges only.

CMT 135 Introduction to 3D Computer Animation 3 cr. (2+4P)

Learning to work in a 3D environment. Introduction to the basics of modeling, animation, dynamics, and rendering. Working with polygons, NURBS and subdivisions, and editing in multiple interfaces. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

CMT 155 Selected Topics 1-4 cr.

Specific titles to the announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credits. Sames as OEGR 155.

CMT 160 Modeling and Animation 3 cr. (2+2P)

Building on student’s knowledge of 2D animation, covers modeling and animating objects and scenes in a 3D environment using various camera and lighting effects. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: CMT 150.

CMT 165 Writing and Storyboarding 3 cr. (2+2P)

Learning good writing principles to create storyboards and scripts that communicate the overall picture of the project, timing, scene complexity, emotion, and resources requirements. Prerequisite: CMT 135 or CMT 160.

CMT 175 3D Character Design 3 cr. (2+4P)

Focus on designing a character and then taking that design and building it in 3D using intermediate modeling techniques. Prerequisite: CMT 135 or CMT 160. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

CMT 180 Principles of Media Design 3 cr. (2+2P)

Techniques and theories of design principles, including layout foundations, logo building, type, color, and story-boarding and their application to print, web, animation and video. Prerequisite: CMT 142 or CMT 146.

CMT 182 Environmental Modeling, Shading and Lighting 3 cr. (2+2P)

Modeling design techniques to create natural and architectural environments to be used for animated films and gaming. Study of various lighting techniques, shading and shadowing. Prerequisite: CMT 135 or CMT 160.

CMT 190 Digital Video Production 1 3cr. (2+4P)

A hands-on study of the tools and techniques used to produce the independent video. Through the production of various short projects, the student explores how the ideas of the writer/director are translated into a visual story. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

CMT 216 Digital Photography and Imaging II 3 cr. (2+2P)

Provide understanding and skills needed for advanced digital capture, editing, optimizing and manipulating photographic images for print, web and multimedia applications. The course will prepare students to make more advanced technical and more refined aesthetic decisions relative to specific photographic applications. Prerequisite(s): CMT 115. Restricted to: Alamogordo, Carlsbad and Dona Ana campuses.

CMT 220 Environmental Scene Design 3 cr. (2+4P)

Modeling design techniques used to create environments and scenes for use in animated films and games. Investigation of both natural and architectural environments to be recreated in the virtual world. Prerequisites: CMT 135 or CMT 160.

CMT 221 Cooperative Experience 1-3 cr.

Student will be employed in approved work site; supervised and rated by employer and instructor. Each credit requires specified number of hours of on-the-job work experience. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Graded S/U.

CMT 223 Media Production Services 1-3 cr.

A design studio environment in which students obtain real-world experience while providing service to college and non-profit associations with faculty supervision using a variety of media. Can be used with permission to fulfill cooperative requirement. Prerequisite: CMT 180 or ART 163. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

CMT 225 Anatomical Character Design 3 cr. (2+4P)

Focus on building anatomy-based 3D characters. Advanced study in NURBS, subdivisions, and polygon modeling techniques used to create fully functional and realist models. Prerequisite: CMT 175. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

CMT 230 Web Design II 3 cr. (2+2P)

Creating and managing well-designed, organized web sites using HTML and web development software. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): CMT 130. Restricted to: Community Colleges only. Crosslisted with: OEGR 230.

CMT 232 Script Development and Storyboarding 3 cr.

Examines effective writing principles for creating storyboards that communicate the overall picture of a project, timing, scene complexity, emotion and resource requirements. Same as ENGL 232 and CMI 232.

CMT 255 Special Topics 1-4 cr.

Specific topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credits.

CMT 260 3D Special Effects 3 cr. (2+4P)

Creating advanced virtual special effects for both rigid and soft bodies. Using MEL, dynamic principles, mixing nodes, and advanced particle systems. How to drive particles over surfaces, add texture to flow, create surface tensions, and use collision events to drive texture. Study of integrating computer-generated imagery with real-life video and audio. Prerequisites: CMT 160 or CMT 225.

CMT 265 Personal Character Development 3 cr. (2+4P)

Focus on the development of personal character(s), from sketch to render. Develop complete biographies of character, then build, skin and animate with as many personal attributes as possible. Prerequisite: CMT 225.

CMT 275 Advanced Web Techniques 3 cr. (2+2P)

Creating and managing complex web sites using advanced techniques and tools. Prerequisite: CMT 145 and CMT 230 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Community Colleges only.

CMT 290 Advanced 3D Animation Workshop A 3 cr. (2+4P)

Program capstone. Students will utilize the skills learned in the program to produce their final animation. Group integrated projects are strongly recommended to emulate a real-world animation studio environment. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Corequisite: CMT 291. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

CMT 291 Advanced 3D Animation Workshop B 3 cr. (2+4P)

Program capstone. Students will utilize the skills learned in the program to produce their final animation. Group integrated projects are strongly recommended to emulate a real-world animation studio environment. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Corequisite: CMT 290. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

CMT 295 Professional Portfolio Design and Development 1-3 cr.

Personalized design and creation of the student’s professional portfolio including hard-copy, demo reel, and online. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Same as OEGR 280.

College Studies

COLL 101 College/Life Success 1-3 cr.

Provides students with an opportunity to cultivate the skills, values, and attitudes necessary to become confident, capable students, and contributing community members. Topics include time management, memory techniques, relationships, health issues, money management, and college and community resources.

COLL 108 Academic Reading and Study Skills 1-4 cr.

Introduction to and practice with strategies for effective reading and studying at the college level. Provides laboratory.

COLL 111 Academic Skills for Mathematics 1-3 cr.

Emphasis on study skills for success in math, up to the calculus level, tailored to meet individual student needs. Topics include test preparation strategies, efficient time management and practice methods, and introduction to and practice with learning software. Consent of instructor required.

COLL 155 Special Topics 1-4 cr.

Covers specific study skills and critical thinking topics. Specific subtitles to be listed in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 8 credits.

Communication Studies

COMM 253G Public Speaking 3 cr.

Principles of effective public speaking, with emphasis on preparing and delivering well-organized, logical, and persuasive arguments adapted to different audiences.

COMM 265G Principles of Human Communication 3 cr.

Study and practice of interpersonal, small group, and presentational skills essential to effective social, business, and professional interaction.

COMM 285 Survey of Communication Theory 3 cr.

Exploration of concepts and methods of study in oral communication. Primarily for majors.

COMM 290 Independent Study 1-3 cr.

Individualized, self-paced projects for students with a special interest in communication topics. Prerequisites: COMM 265G and sophomore standing. May be repeated for maximum of 6 credits.

COMM 291 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects and credits to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Drafting

DRFT 109 Computer Drafting Fundamentals 3 cr. (2+2P)

Introduction to computer-aided drafting. Principles and fundamentals of drafting using the latest version of AutoCAD software. Same as E T 109.

Electrical and Computer Engineering

E E 280 DC and AC Circuits 4 cr. (3+1P)

Electric component descriptions and equations. Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws, formulations and solution of network equations in the time and frequency domain. Applications of circuit analysis to ideal op amps. Complete solutions of RLC and switching networks. Mutual coupling. Prerequisite(s): C or better in MATH 192G and PHYS 216G.

Environmental Science

E S 110G Introductory Environmental Science 4 cr. (3+1P)

Introduction to environmental science as related to the protection, remediation, and sustainability of land, air, water, and food resources. Emphasis on the use of the scientific method and critical thinking skills in understanding environmental issues.

Engineering Technology

E T 104 Soldering Techniques 1 cr. (3P)

Fundamentals of soldering, desoldering, and quality inspection of printed circuit boards.

E T 106 Drafting Concepts/Computer Drafting Fundamentals I 4 cr. (2+4P)

Basic drafting skills, terminology, and visualization. Introduction to principles and fundamentals of computer-aided drafting. Prerequisite: OECS 125, OECS 207, or consent of instructor. Community Colleges only. Same as DRFT 112.

E T 109 Computer Drafting Fundamentals 3 cr. (2+2P)

Crosslisted with DRFT 109, C E 109 and SUR 109.

E T 120 Computation and Presentation Software 3 cr.

The use of database, spreadsheet, and presentation software in the field of engineering technology. Introduction to Internet resources and construction of homepages.

E T 125 Introduction to Renewable Energy 3 cr.

Renewable energy systems, including topics in thermal-solar photovoltaic, wind, geothermal systems, and other current topics. Theory, practical applications, safety considerations and the economics of alternative renewable energy systems compared to conventional systems.

E T 126 Fundamentals of Solar Energy 3 cr.

Solar energy technologies, including topics in passive, solar thermal and photovoltaic systems. Theory, practical applications, safety considerations and the economics of solar renewable energy systems compared to conventional systems.

E T 128 Fundamentals of Sustainable Construction 3 cr.

Sustainable building materials, methods, and techniques including green architecture and design, code, standards and specifications.

E T 153 Introduction to Computer Networks 3 cr.

Introduction to basic computer network fundamentals including International Open Systems Interconnect (OSI), the seven-layer model, and various networking hardware devices. Community Colleges only.

E T 155 Network Operating Systems I 3 cr. (3+1P)

Introduction to a computer network operating system. May not be used as part of an E T degree program on main campus. Prerequisite(s): E T 120 or E T 122. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

E T 182 Digital Logic 3 cr.

The use of truth tables, Boolean equations, and diagrams to define, simplify, and implement logic-valued functions.

E T 183 Applied DC Circuits 2 cr.

Application of Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s laws, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems to the analysis of DC passive circuits. Corequisite(s): MATH 120G.

E T 183L Applied DC Circuits Laboratory 1 cr. (2P)

Laboratory to accompany E T 183. Corequisite: E T 183.

E T 184 Applied AC Circuits 2 cr.

Application of circuit laws and theorems to analysis of AC passive circuits. Resonant circuit, polyphase circuit, and magnetic circuit topics are introduced. Prerequisite(s): E T 183. Corequisite(s): MATH 121G.

E T 184L Applied AC Circuits Laboratory 1 cr. (2P)

Laboratory to accompany E T 184. Corequisite: E T 184.

E T 200 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Directed study or project. Prerequisite: consent of department head. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

E T 216 Drafting Concepts/Computer Drafting Fundamentals II 4 cr. (2+4P)

Drafting for mechanical/industrial applications, machine part detailing, assemblies in orthographic, isometric, auxiliary, oblique, and sectional views. Two-dimensional Auto CAD with introduction to 3-D Auto CAD. Prerequisite: E T 106. Community Colleges only. Same as DRFT 113.

E T 220 Internship 1-6 cr.

Internship requiring an approved number of hours of varied and progressive experience in the field of study. The scope and other requirements of the internship are stated in an individualized syllabus and through a memorandum of understanding between the faculty mentor and the industry partner. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

E T 230 Introduction to Servo Systems 3 cr.

Topics include uses of servos in the industry, servo types, lop gains and frequency response, software control systems, damping, feedback, encoders, synchros and resolvers. Prerequisite(s): E T 246

E T 246 Electronic Devices I 4 cr. (3+3P)

Solid-state devices including diodes, bipolar-transistors, and field-effect transistors. Use of these devices in rectifier circuits, small-signal and power amplifiers. Prerequisite(s): (E T 190 and E T 191) or E T 184.

E T 251 Design Topics 1-3 cr.

Directed individual project. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. Prerequisite: consent of department head.

E T 253 Networking Operating Systems II 3 cr. (3+1P)

Introduction to a computer network operating system. May not be used as part of an E T degree on main campus. Prerequisite(s): E T 120 or E T 122. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

E T 256 Networking Operating Systems III 3 cr. (3+1P)

Introduction to a computer network operating system. May not be used as part of an E T degree program on main campus. Prerequisite(s): E T 120 or E T 122. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

E T 262 Software Technology I 3 cr.

An introduction to computer programming concepts as applied to engineering technology. Includes basic logic design, algorithm development, debugging and documentation. History and use of computers and their impact on society. Satisfies general education computer science requirement. Prerequisite(s): E T 120 or E T 122.

E T 272 Electronics Devices II 4 cr. (3+3P)

Differential amplifiers, operational amplifiers, positive and negative feedback, and computer-aided circuit analysis. Prerequisite(s): E T 246 and MATH 235.

E T 273 Fundamentals of Networking Communications I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Introduction to networking basics, including computer hardware and software; electricity; networking terminology; protocols; LANs; WANs; OSI model; IP addressing; and design and documentation of basic network and structure cabling. Community Colleges only.

E T 276 Electronic Communications 4 cr. (3+3P)

Antennas, transmission devices, A-M and F-M transmission and detection, pulse systems, microwave systems. Prerequisite: E T 246.

E T 277 Fundamentals of Network Communications II 3 cr. (2+2P)

Introduction to routers and routing, including router-user interfaces, components and configuration, IOS versions, naming, software backups, TCP/IP protocol suite, IP addressing and subnetting, RIP, and IGRP. Prerequisite: E T 273. Community Colleges only.

E T 282 Digital Electronics 4 cr. (3+3P)

Applications of digital integrated circuits, multiplexers, counters, arithmetic circuits, and microprocessors. Prerequisites: E T 182. Prerequisite/corequisite: E T 190 or E T 184.

E T 283 Hardware PC Maintenance 3 cr. (3+1P)

Installing, configuring, troubleshooting, and maintaining personal computer hardware components. Prerequisite: E T 120 or E T 122.

E T 284 Software PC Maintenance 3 cr. (3+1P)

Installing, configuring, troubleshooting, and maintaining personal computer operating systems. Prerequisite: E T 120 or E T 122.

E T 285 Principles of Security 3 cr. (3+1P)

Examines the field of information security within a real-world context of issues faced by today’s I T professionals. Prerequisite(s): E T 283 or consent of instructor.

E T 286 Fundamentals of Security 3 cr. (3+1P)

An overview of general security concepts for information technology systems. Prerequisite(s): E T 283 or consent of instructor.

E T 287 PC Disaster and Data Recovery 3 cr.

This course provides an overview of the various causes of personal computer data failure and methods to mitigate the loss of your personal computer data. The focus is on restoring your personal computer to full PC functionality and recovering lost and damaged files after one of these unforeseen problems. In addition, the course provides a means to lessen the impact of these inevitable events with the preparation of a disaster recovery plan. Prerequisite(s): E T 120 or E T 122.

E T 289 Database Fundamentals 3cr.

The course includes database design, administration, security issues, and using the systems developed to access data in various computer and communication environments. Prerequisite(s): E T 120 or E T 122.

E T 290 Networking Wireless Communication 3 cr. (3+1P)

This course provides an introduction to wireless networking and communications. Some of the topics covered are protocols, transmission methods, and IEEE 802.11 standards. Wireless LAN (WLAN) fundamentals, devices, security, cellular telephony, broadband, and satellite communications. Prerequisite: ET 273.

E T 291 PC Forensics and Investigation 3cr.

Introduction to computer forensics and investigative fundamentals. Topics include understanding computer forensic
and investigation law and requirements, processing crime and incident scenes, and the extraction, preservation, analysis, and presentation of computer-related evidence. Prerequisites: E T 120 or E T 122.

Early Childhood Education

ECED 115 Child Growth, Development, and Learning 3 cr.

Biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive, and language domains of child growth and development. The process of development and the adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development, and learning.

ECED 125 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 2 cr.

Sound health, safety, and nutritional practices to provide an emotionally and physically safe environment for young children in partnership with their families.

ECED 135 Family and Community Collaboration 3 cr.

Development of open, friendly, and collaborative relationships with each child’s family, encouraging family involvement, and supporting the child’s relationship with his or her family. The diverse cultures and languages representative of families in New Mexico’s communities are honored. Prerequisites: ECED 115 and ENGL 111G.

ECED 235 Introduction to Reading and Literacy Development 3 cr.

Selection of developmentally appropriate materials and appropriate instructional methods for the development of reading and literacy in young children. Prerequisites: ECED 115 and ENGL 111G.

ECED 245 Early Childhood Education Professionalism 2 cr.

Development of integrity, responsibility, and ethical practices that demonstrate multicultural respect for all children and families.

ECED 255 Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs 3 cr.

Development of diverse assessment approaches, including observational skills. Prerequisites: ECED 115 and ENGL 111G. Same as SPED 255.

ECED 265 Guiding Young Children 3 cr.

Role of adults in guidance, effect of child development on guidance and development of pro-social behaviors using developmentally appropriate guidance strategies.

Economics

ECON 201G Introduction to Economics 3 cr.

Economic institutions and current issues with special emphasis on the American economy.

ECON 251G Principles of Macroeconomics 3 cr.

Macroeconomic theory and public policy: national income concepts, unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and international payment problems.

ECON 252G Principles of Microeconomics 3 cr.

Microeconomic theory and public policy: supply and demand, theory of the firm, market allocation of resources, income distribution, competition and monopoly, governmental regulation of businesses and unions.

Education

EDUC 161 Project Wild 1 cr.

A supplemental, interdisciplinary instructional program for teachers of K-12 students. A way for teachers to incorporate concepts related to people, wildlife and a healthy environment into all major school subject and skill areas. Emphasizes lively, hands-on, diverse and instructionally sound educational activities. Community Colleges only.

EDUC 162 Project WET 1 cr.

Project WET (Water Education for Teachers), an international, interdisciplinary, water science and education program for formal and non-formal educators of K-12 student. Facilitates and promotes awareness, appreciation, knowledge, and stewardship of water resources through the development and dissemination of classroom ready teaching aids based on the Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide, a collection of over 90 innovative, interdisciplinary activities that are hands-on, easy to use and fun. Community Colleges only.

EDUC 163 Project Learning Tree 1 cr.

An award winning environmental education program for teachers and other educators of students PK-12. Uses the forest as a window to the world to increase students’ understanding of our complex environment; stimulate critical and creative thinking; develop the ability to make informed decisions on environmental issues; and instill the confidence and commitment to take responsible action. Includes activities that help teach science, mathematics, English, language arts, social studies, history, visual and performing arts. Community Colleges only.

EDUC 181 Field Experience I 1 cr.

Introduction to public school teaching, school visits, classroom observations, and discussion seminar.

EDUC 195 Individual Topics in Education 1-3 cr.

Supervised study in a specific area of interest. Each course shall be designated by a qualifying subtitle. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Electronics Technology

ELT 205 Semiconductor Devices 4 cr.(3+3P)

Analysis and trouble shooting of linear electronic circuits including amplifiers, op-amps, power supplies, and oscillators. Prerequisite(s): ELT 110 & ELT 135 or consent of instructor. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

ELT 265 Special Topics 1-6 cr.

Topic to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

Educational Management and Development

EMD 101 Freshman Orientation 1 cr.

Introduction to the university and to the College of Education. Discussion of and planning for individualized education program and field experience. Graded S/U.

EMD 250 Introduction to Education 2 cr.

An overview of the American education system with emphasis on organization, governance, law, demographics, and professional practice.

English

Credit for English 111G is prerequisite for every English numbered 200 or above.

ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition 4 cr.

Skills and methods used in writing university-level essays. Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 16 or higher during regular semester(20 or above during summer) or successful completion of a developmental writing course or the equivalent.

ENGL 112 Rhetoric and Composition II 2 cr.

A continuation of English 111G for those desiring more work in composition. Weekly themes based on outside reading. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 111G or equivalent.

ENGL 200 Independent Study 1-3 cr.

Individual work in literature; open to freshman excused from freshman composition and others. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. May be repeated for unlimited credit under different subtitles.

ENGL 203G Business and Professional Communication 3 cr.

Effective writing for courses and careers in business, law, government, and other professions. Strategies for researching and writing correspondence and reports, with an emphasis on understanding and responding to a variety of communication tasks with a strong purpose, clear organization, and vigorous professional style.

ENGL 211G Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences 3 cr.

Theory and practice in interpreting texts from various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Strategies for researching, evaluating, constructing, and writing researched arguments. Course subtitled in the Schedule of Classes.

ENGL 218G Technical and Scientific Communication 3 cr.

Effective writing for courses and careers in sciences, engineering, and agriculture. Strategies for understanding and presenting technical information for various purposes to various audiences.

ENGL 220G Introduction to Creative Writing 3 cr.

Examines classic and contemporary literature in three genres. Various forms, terminologies, methods and technical aspects of each genre, and the art and processes of creative writing.

ENGL 232 Script Development and Storyboarding 3 cr.

Examines effective writing principles for creating storyboards that communicate the overall picture of a project, timing, scene complexity, emotion and resource requirements. Crosslisted with: CMI 232.

ENGL 235 Narrative: Principles of Story Across the Media 3 cr.

Examines the various strategies of narrative structure and its principal components (plot, theme, character, imagery,
symbolism, point of view) with an attempt to connect them to elements of contemporary forms of media expression.

ENGL 240 Introduction to Literature 3 cr.

Intended primarily for non-English majors, course will introduce poetry, fiction, and drama from a variety of periods. There will be some introduction of critical terminology and some attention to writing about literary works of art.

ENGL 243 The Bible as Literature 3 cr.

Develops informed readings of Hebrew and Christian scriptures. Emphasizes understanding Biblical literary forms, techniques, themes; historical, cultural contexts for interpretation; authorship, composition, audience for individual books; development of Biblical canon.

ENGL 244G Literature and Culture 3 cr.

Intensive reading of and discussion and writing about selected masterpieces of world literature. Emphasizes cultural and historical contexts of readings to help students appreciate literary traditions. Core texts include works by Homer, Dante, and Shakespeare, a classic novel, an important non-Western work, and modern literature.

ENGL 251 Survey of American Literature I 3 cr.

From the colonial period to the transcendentalists.

ENGL 252 Survey of American Literature II 3 cr.

From Whitman to the present.

ENGL 261 Masterpieces of Western Europe Literature, Beginnings to the Renaissance 3 cr.

Great Western European literature from its beginning in the epic and other oral forms to some of the major Renaissance works that form the foundations of much of our modern literary culture.

ENGL 262 Masterpieces of Western European Literature, Post-Renaissance to Modern Times 3 cr.

Modern Western European literary classics, from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, with attention to the rise of the novel and other modern forms.

ENGL 271 Survey of English Literature I 3 cr.

From Beowulf through the eighteenth century.

ENGL 272 Survey of English Literature II 3 cr.

From the pre-Romantics to the present.

ENGL 299 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Emphasis on a literary and/or writing subject chosen for the semester. May be repeated for unlimited credit under different subtitles.

Engineering

ENGR 100 Introduction to Engineering 3 cr. (2+3P)

An introduction to the various engineering disciplines, the engineering approach to problem solving, and the design process. Projects emphasize the importance of teamwork, written & oral communication skills, as well as ethical responsibilities.

ENGR 111 Matlab Programming 3 cr.

An introduction to the MATLAB computing environment. Emphasis on basic input/output and the programming skills
needed to perform elementary data manipulation and analysis. Prerequisite(s): C S 110.

Finance

FIN 210 Financial Planning and Investments 3 cr.

Individual financial planning and related financial markets and institutions. Community Colleges only.

Food Science & Technology

FSTE 200 1-4cr.

Specific topics and credits to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 4 credits per semester and a grand total of 9 credits.

FSTE 263G Food Science I 4 cr. (4+3P)

The scientific study of the principles involved in the preparation and evaluation of foods.

Fishery, Wildlife and Conservation Ecology

FWCE 110 Introduction to Natural Resource Management 3 cr.

Introduction to managing natural resources with an emphasis on historical and current issues affecting the management of renewable natural resources.

Geography

GEOG 111G Geography of the Natural Environment 4 cr. (3+3P)

Introduction to the physical processes that shape the human environment: climate and weather, vegetation dynamics and distribution, soil development and classification, and geomorphic processes and landform development.

GEOG 112G World Regional Geography 3 cr.

Overview of the physical geography, natural resources, cultural landscapes, and current problems of the world’s major regions. Students will also examine current events at a variety of geographic scales.

GEOG 291 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Geology

GEOL 111G Survey of Geology 4 cr. (3+3P)

Covers the fundamental principles of physical geology, including the origin of minerals and rocks, geologic time, rock deformation, and plate tectonics.

GEOL 212G The Dynamic Earth 4 cr. (3+3P)

Introduction to earth systems. Geology and the solid earth, geologic time and earth history, water and the world oceans, atmosphere and weather, the solar system. Community Colleges only.

GEOL 220 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Community Colleges only. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

GEOL 295 Environmental Geology 3 cr.

Earth processes that affect humans and their works, properties of rocks and soils, use and application of environmental geologic data.

German

Students may not receive credit for a lower level course which is a prerequisite to a higher level course for which credit has been received or which is being taken for credit.

GER 111 Elementary German I 4 cr.

German for beginners. Stress on speaking skills.

GER 112 Elementary German II 4 cr.

German for beginners and students with one year of high school German. Stress on speaking skills. Prerequisite: C or better in GER 111.

GER 211 Intermediate German I 3cr.

Speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C or better in GER 112.

GER 212 Intermediate German II 3 cr.

Speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C or better in GER 211.

Government

GOVT 100G American National Government 3 cr.

U.S. constitutional system; legislative, executive, and judicial processes; popular and group influence.

GOVT 110G Introduction to Political Science 3 cr.

This class covers fundamental concepts such as justice, sovereignty and power; political theories and ideologies; and
government systems that range from democratic to authoritarian.

GOVT 150G American Political Issues 3 cr.

Major contemporary problems of American society and their political implications.

GOVT 160G International Political Issues 3 cr.

Current developments and issues in world politics.

Health Sciences

HL S 125 Introduction to Health Careers 1-3 cr.

Introduction to many health care related fields. Career counseling and job placement and scholarship information. Covers education requirements and career information for various health care related fields. Graded S/U.

HL S 150 Personal Health and Wellness 3 cr.

A holistic and multi-disciplinary approach towards promoting positive lifestyles. Special emphasis is placed on major problems that have greatest significance to personal and community health. Topics to include nutrition, stress management, fitness, aging, sexuality, drug education, and others.

History

HIST 101G Roots of Modern Europe 3 cr.

Economic, social, political, and cultural development from earliest times to about 1700.

HIST 102G Modern Europe 3 cr.

Economic, social, political, and cultural development from 1700 to the present.

HIST 201G Introduction to Early American History 3 cr.

History of the United States to 1877, with varying emphasis on social, political, economic, diplomatic, and cultural development.

HIST 202G Introduction to Recent American History 3 cr.

History of the United States since 1877, with varying emphasis on social, political, economic, diplomatic, and cultural development.

HIST 261 New Mexico 3 cr.

Economic, political, and social development of New Mexico from exploration to modern times. Community Colleges only.

HIST 269 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Community Colleges only. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 275 Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science 3 cr.

Introduction to the history and philosophy of science. Community Colleges only.

Health Information Technology

HIT 150 Introduction to Medical Terminology 3 cr.

The study and understanding of medical terminology as it relates to diseases, their causes and effects, and the terminology used in various medical specialties. Emphasis will be placed on learning the basic elements of medical words, appropriate spelling and use of medical terms, and use of medical abbreviations. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

Health Science

HL S 100 Introduction to Health Science 1 cr.

An overview of professional career opportunities in the realm of health science as well as the functional roles of practice, education, administration, and research. Some field trips will be required.

HL S 150G Personal Health and Wellness 3 cr.

A holistic and multi-disciplinary approach towards promoting positive lifestyles. Special emphasis is place on major problems that have greatest significance to personal and community health. Topics to include nutrition, stress management, fitness, aging, sexuality, drug education and more.

Human Nutrition and Diet

HNDS 163 Nutrition for Health 3 cr.

Nutrition principles and applications to food choices that support health; psychological, economic, and cultural implications of food choices. Open to majors and nonmajors.

HNDS 251 Human Nutrition 3 cr.

Principles of normal nutrition. Relation of nutrition to health. Course contains greater amounts of chemistry and biology than HNDS 163. Open to nonmajors.

Honors College

Entering freshmen must have a minimum ACT composite of 26 to qualify for enrollment in the following courses. Other students need a 3.5 GPA to enroll in honors courses.

HON 210G The Accidental Mathematician 3 cr.

The relation between mathematics and our cultural heritage, the role of mathematics in history and the role of history in mathematics, the nature and power of contemporary mathematics, the need of doing mathematics to learn mathematics, the verbalization and reasoning necessary to understand symbolism, and the existence of a large body of interesting writing about mathematics.

HON 233 Social Problems 3 cr.

Introduction to contemporary social problems from multiple perspectives. Discussions of definition, impact, and prospective solutions to major social issues, such as crime, drug abuse, social inequality, family, population, environment, and social change.

HON 244G Masterpieces of World Literature 3 cr.

Introduction to literature through intensive study of masterpieces from a range of cultures. Includes classical and modern works as well as non-Western literature. Genres include poetry, fiction, and drama.

HON 245G Chemistry: Experiments, Laws, and Theories 4 cr. (3+3P)

Examination of the experimental methods and results, and mental processes used by chemists in our modern understanding of chemistry.

HON 249G American Politics in a Changing World. 3 cr.

American politics and policies examined from a historical and global perspective. Philosophical underpinnings of American national government, the structure of government based on that philosophy, and the practical implications of both the philosophical and structural base. How American government influences and is influenced by the world community.

HON 265G Principles of Human Communication Honors 3 cr.

Study and practice of interpersonal, small group, and presentational skills essential to effective social, business, and professional interaction.

Journalism and Mass Communication

JOUR 105G Media and Society 3 cr.

Functions and organization of the mass media system in the United States; power of the mass media to affect knowledge, opinions, and social values; and the impact of new technologies.

Library Science

L SC 110 Reference and Information Resources 1 3 cr.

Overview of reference services. Introduction to, and evaluation of, basic information resources (both print and electronic) and their application in library and information centers.

Library Science

LIB 101 Introduction to Research 1 cr.

A practical, hands-on, step-by-step introduction to the basics of university-level library research. Topics include the academic method, plagiarism, selection and use of information resources. (Eight-week course.)

LIB 111 Introduction to Information Literacy in an Electronic Environment 3 cr.

Introduction to the basics of the research process; the organization, location and evaluation of information using print, non-print and electronic resources; and techniques of effective personal information management in a computerized setting. Uses a combination of active and hands-on learning methods as well as lectures.

Linguistics

LING 200G Introduction of Language 3 cr.

Traditional fields of language study (sound, grammar, meaning) and newer ones (language as social behavior, language and cognition, language variation, animal communication).

Mechanical Engineering

M E 234 Mechanics-Dynamics 3 cr.

Kinematics and dynamics behavior of solid bodies utilizing vector methods. Prerequisites: MATH 192G, C E 233. Corequisite: MATH 291G.

Mathematics

The NMSU Bachelor degree basic skills requirement in mathematics may be met by earning a grade C or higher in both MATH 111 and MATH 112G, or in any lower-division mathematics course numbered 120 or above.
Students may not receive credit for a lower-division mathematics course that the student has previously passed with grade of C or better.
NOTE: Students without an adequate placement score to enroll in MATH 111, MATH 120, or MATH 210G can gain admission to the course by earning a C or better in CCDM 114N at an NMSU Community College Campus. Students wishing to enroll in MATH 121G, 142G, 190G, 230, 291G or STAT 251G must satisfy one of the following: (a) have passed the stated prerequisite course with a C or better, or (b) have earned an adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Examination.

MATH 107 Topics in Mathematics 1-3 cr.

Topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 3 credits per semester. Total credit not to exceed 6 credits. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Community Colleges only.

MATH 111 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics I 3 cr.

Numbers and the four operations of arithmetic. Understanding and comparing multiple representations of numbers and operations, in particular how these presentations build from whole numbers to integers to fractions and decimals. Applying properties of numbers and operation in contextual situations, including measurement, and making reasonable estimates. Reasoning, communicating, and problem solving with numbers and operations. Application to ration and connections with algebra. Taught primarily through student activities and investigations. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 111G and grade C or better in Math 120.

MATH 112G Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics II 3 cr.

Geometry and measurement. Multiple approaches to solving problems and understanding concepts in geometry. Analyzing and constructing two-and three-dimensional shapes Measurable attributes, including angle, length , area and volume. Understanding and applying units and unit conversions. Transformations, congruence, and symmetry. Scale factor and similarity. Coordinate communicating about geometric concepts. Taught primarily though student activities and investigations. Prerequisite(s): C or better in MATH 111.

MATH 120 Intermediate Algebra 3 cr.

Linear and algebraic functions as they arise in real world problems. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Equations and inequalities and their solutions considered symbolically, graphically, and numerically. Prerequisite: adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Examination (see note above.)

MATH 121G College Algebra 3 cr.

Fundamental concepts of function, including algebraic and graphical properties. Fitting functions to data. Finding zeroes and extreme values. Solving systems of equations. Prerequisites: Adequate math placement score or C or better in MATH 120.

MATH 142G Calculus for the Biological and Management Sciences I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Review of functions. Derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives and indefinite integrals, basic ordinary differential equations and growth models, with an emphasis on applications. Includes a significant writing component. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 121.

MATH 190G Trigonometry and Precalculus 4 cr. (3+2P)

Elementary functions used in the sciences with emphasis on trigonometric functions and their inverses. Polar coordinates. Complex numbers and Euler’s formula. Analytic geometry and vectors. Prerequisites: Adequate math placement score or C or better in MATH 121.

MATH 191G Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 cr.

Algebraic, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions, theory and computation of derivatives, approximation, graphing, and modeling. May include an introduction to integration. Prerequisites: MATH 190G.

MATH 192G Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 cr.

Riemann sums, the definite integral, anti-derivatives, fundamental theorems, use of integral tables, numerical integration, modeling, improper integrals, differential equations, series, Taylor polynomials. Prerequisite: MATH 191G.

MATH 200 Directed Study 1-3 cr.

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Graded S/U.

MATH 210G Mathematics Appreciation 3 cr.

Mathematics and its role in the development and maintenance of civilization. Prerequisites: High school algebra and adequate score on the Mathematics Placement Examination.

MATH 215 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics II 3 cr.

Probability, statistics, ratios, and proportional relationships. Experimental and theoretical probability. Collecting, analyzing, and displaying data, including measurement data. Multiple approaches to solving problems involving proportional relationships, with connections to number and operation, geometry and measurement, and algebra. Understanding data in professional contexts of teaching. Taught primarily through student activities and investigations. Prerequisite(s): C or better in MATH 112 and admittance into the TEP program.

MATH 230 Matrices and Linear Programming 3 cr.

Linear algebra, linear programming and network models, with applications to the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 121G.

MATH 291 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 3 cr.

Vector algebra, directional derivatives, approximation, max-min problems, multiple integrals, applications, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, change of variables. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 192G.

Management

MGT 201 Introduction to Management 3 cr.

Covers the functioning and administration of different types of complex organizations. Concepts and theories of management and organizational behavior.

Marketing

MKTG 203 Introduction to Marketing 3 cr.

Covers processes, functions, and principles in the current marketing system. Includes role of marketing in the economy, types of markets, product development, distribution channels, pricing and promotion strategies, market research and management of the processes. Community Colleges only.

Music

MUS 101G An Introduction to Music 3 cr.

Introduction to music for the non-music major to encourage the enjoyment of listening to and understanding the world’s great music from the past to the present.

MUS 110 Fundamentals of Music 2 cr.

Sight singing, ear training, beginning harmony. For students with little or no theory background. May be taken for a maximum of 4 credits.

MUS 130 Applied Music 1-2 cr.

Private or group instruction for non-music majors, secondary instruments, and majors preparing for 200-level applied music. May be taken for unlimited credit.

MUS 160 University Singers 1-2 cr.

A select concert and touring choir that sings masterworks with orchestra. May be taken for unlimited credit.

MUS 161 Concert Choir 1 cr.

Campus choir composed of both music and nonmusic majors. Emphasis on vocal techniques, sight singing, and basics of choral musicianship. May be taken for unlimited credits.

MUS 162 Master Works Chorus 1 cr.

Combination campus and community chorus. This group will perform the major chorale compositions for orchestra and/or wind ensemble. May be taken for unlimited credit.

MUS 163 Jazz Ensembles 1 cr.

Twenty-piece bands that perform contemporary jazz. May be taken for unlimited credit.

MUS 164 Chamber Ensembles 1 cr.

Small groups of singers and/or instrumentalists that perform chamber music. May be taken for unlimited credit.

MUS 201G History of Jazz in Popular Music: A Blending of Cultures 3 cr.

Jazz in popular music as it relates to music history and the development of world cultures.

MUS 260 Special Topics I 1-3 cr.

Emphasis on special areas of music; designed for highly motivated students. May be taken for unlimited credits.

Nursing Assistant

NA 101 Nursing Assistant Theory and Lab 6 cr. (5+3P)

Nurse aide skills with emphasis on a bio-psychosocial-cultural approach to patient care. Practice of these skills is provided in the laboratory as well as at a clinical site. Successful completion of the course prepares and qualifies the student to take the NACES certification examination. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NA 103 Introduction to Health Care Services 3 cr.

Introduction to health care services, functions and responsibilities of a nurse aide, ethical and legal considerations, communication and medical terminology.

NA 106 Home Health Assistant 4 cr. (3+3P)

Theory, skills and clinical experience leading to a job working with clients in the home environment. Prepares the certified nursing assistant for certification in the home health care arena. Prerequisite: current CNA or consent of instructor. Corequisites: CCDM 114N and CCDE 110N.

Natural Science

NSC 121G Integrated Natural Sciences I 4 cr. (3+3P)

Concepts in astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, and physics; connections between the sciences. Process of scientific investigation studies by inquiry into contemporary scientific problems. Designed to meet the needs of elementary education majors. Corequisite: MATH 111 or equivalent.

Nursing

The following courses are offered only at the Alamogordo branch.

NURS 150 Medical Terminology 3 cr.

Understanding of the basic elements of medical words. Use of medical abbreviations. Same as OEHO 120 and BOT 150.

NURS 155 Special Topics 1-4 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

The following Nursing courses are restricted to NURS majors selected for the program unless approved by Nursing Program Director. All the following NURS courses in this catalog are restricted to Community Colleges only.

NURS 170 Foundations of Nursing 7 cr. (4+9P)

Holistic approach to basic physical wellness and mental health of the adult client. Clinical experience will include in-patient and out-patient psychiatric settings, wellness, and physical assessment. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 172 Critical Thinking and Nursing Process 2 cr.

Holistic approach to wellness utilizing the nursing process and critical thinking. Introduces the nursing process and various methods of applying the process in delivery of client care. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 173L Practicum: Physical Assessment 1 cr. (3P)

Using the nursing process, the student will be able to perform a basic health history and physical examination on an adult client. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 225 and BIOL 226 OR BIOL 235 and BIOL 254. Restricted to: Community Colleges only. Restricted to NURS and OEEM majors.

NURS 180 The Adult Client I 8 cr. (4+12P)

Holistic care of the adult client throughout the lifespan, utilizing the nursing process to address personal wellness and acute alterations in wellness in a variety of health care settings. Laboratory and clinical practicum will focus on application of the nursing process in simulated and real world settings. Prerequisite(s): NURS 170, NURS 172, and NURS 173L. Corequisite(s): NURS 185. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 182 Legal and Ethical Issues in Nursing Practice 2 cr.

Introduction to legal and ethical implications of nursing practice (through the holistic approach to wellness) as a registered nurse. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 185 Holistic Approach to Pharmacotherapeutic Intervention I 2 cr.

Level I. Holistic approach to the study of basic pharmacology concepts. Includes pharmacodynamic phases of drug interaction. Nursing process is discussed in relation to medication administration. Special emphasis on the role of the nurse and basic concepts related to specific drug categories. Prerequisite(s): NURS 170, NURS 172, and NURS 173L. Corequisite(s): NURS 180. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 270 The Adult Client II 5 cr. (2+9P)

Care of adult clients experiencing chronic, life-threatening, and end-of-life health alterations with emphasis on the geriatric population using a holistic approach to wellness. Nursing process, pathophysiology, pharmacology, diet therapy, and alternative therapies are stressed throughout the course. Clinical component will provide an opportunity to apply the nursing process in both the hospital and community setting. Prerequisite(s): NURS 170, NURS 172, NURS 173L, NURS 180, and NURS 185. Corequisite(s): NURS 285. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 272 Care for the Aging Client 1 cr.

Normal physiological changes of aging and nursing implications related to safety and wellness. Restricted to: Community Colleges only. Restricted to NURS majors.

NURS 275 Holistic Approach to Pharmacotherapeutic Intervention II 2 cr.

Level II. Holistic approach to the study of basic pharmacology concepts. Includes pharmacodynamic phases of drug interaction. Nursing process is discussed in relation to medication administration. Special emphasis on the role of the nurse and basic concepts related to specific drug categories. Prerequisite: NURS 185. Corequisites: NURS 280 and NURS 283. Restricted to majors. Community Colleges only.

NURS 280 Women’s Health Issues 4 cr. (2+6P)

Consists of lecture and associated clinical/laboratory experiences that focus on the holistic health concerns for women and the care of families expecting birth. Emphasis placed on the wellness of normal and high-risk women’s health, including maternal and newborn care. The nursing process will be utilized to develop caring interventions and effective community communication through teaching healthy strategies. Prerequisites: NURS 170 and NURS 180. Corequisite(s): NURS 275 and NURS 283. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 282L Practicum: Management of Client Care 1 cr. (3P)

Organization and delivery of wellness care services for groups of clients based on the nursing process. Prerequisite(s): NURS 170, NURS 172, NURS 173L, NURS 180, and NURS 185. Corequisite(s): NURS 284L. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 283 Pediatric Nursing 4 cr. (2+6P)

Consists of lecture and associated clinical and laboratory experiences which focus on the care of children from infancy through adolescence including acute and chronic health care problems. Employs nursing process, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and diet therapy through the holistic approach to wellness. Prerequisite: NURS 170 and NURS 180. Corequisite(s): NURS 275, NURS 280. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 284 Practicum: Preceptorship 3cr. (9P)

Clinical experience in a leadership role in specific practice areas enhancing the transition from student to practitioner utilizing the holistic approach to wellness. Prerequisite(s): NURS 182. Corequisite(s): NURS 282L. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 285 Holistic Approach to Pharmacotherapeutic Intervention III 1 cr.

Level III. Holistic approach to the study of basic pharmacology concepts. Includes pharmacodynamic phases of drug interaction. Nursing process is discussed in relation to medication administration. Special emphasis on the role of the nurse and basic concepts related to specific drug categories. Prerequisite(s): NURS 185 and NURS 275. Corequisite(s): NURS 270. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

NURS 290 Pathophysiology I 1-3 cr.

An introduction to pathophysiologic concepts using a body systems approach. Prerequisite: BIOL 226 or BIOL 254.

NURS 291 Pathophysiology II 1-3 cr.

A continuation of materials presented in NURS 290, Pathophysiology I, covering the remaining body systems. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 226 or BIOL 254 and NURS 290 or consent of program director. Restricted to: Alamogordo campus, Carlsbad campus, Dona Ana campus, Grants campus.

Biomedical Technology – Occupational Education

OEBM 140 Applied human Biology for Biomedical Technology 3 cr.

Essential human biology, anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology for biomedical equipment technicians. Focus on the vocabulary necessary for effective communication in the hospital environment as part of the health care team. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

OEBM 141 Introduction to Medical Electronics for Biomedical Technology 3 cr.

Introduction to the biomedical electronics technology field. Physiologic measurements, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, and pressure and temperature. Operation of common biomedical electronic equipment. Hospital safety regulations explained. Prerequisite(s): OEBM 140. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

OEBM 200 Biomedical Practicum 3 cr. (9P)

Practice working in industry as a biomedical electronics technologist. Students work on a variety of medical equipment and job tasks. An employer evaluation, student report, and minimum of 100 work hours are required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): OEBM 140 and OEBM 141. Restricted to Community Colleges only.

OEBM 210 Biomedical Clinical 4 cr. (1+9P)

Clinical experiences to include advanced biomedical equipment maintenance, inventory control, and medical facility and industry standards. Prerequisite(s): OEBM 200. Restricted to Biomedical majors.

OEBM 240 Introduction to Radiography Systems for Biomedical Technology 3 cr.

The fundamentals of diagnostic radiography equipment will be explored. Principles of an x-ray system will be explained including the x-ray generation, image formation and film processing. Focus will be on both safety and quality. Prerequisite(s): OEBM 140. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

Computer Technology-Occupational Education

OECS 101 Computer Basics 1 cr.

Hands-on instruction to introduce computer use and commonly used software. Graded S/U.

OECS 105 Introduction to Microcomputer Technology 3 cr.

History and impact of computers on the economy and society. Development of basic skills in operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, and databases.

OECS 110 Introduction to PowerPoint 1 cr.

An introduction to PowerPoint software to develop business presentations. Includes concepts of basic presentation methods and graphic design principles. Students will create and deliver presentations using text, charts, digitized images, and sound. Prerequisites: BCIS 110, C S 110 or OECS 105.

OECS 111 Introduction to Outlook 1 cr.

An introduction to Outlook email, calendar, contacts, tasks, and notes. Includes integrating other applications with Outlook components. Prerequisite: C S 110, BCIS 110, or OECS 105.

OECS 125 Operating Systems 1-3 cr.

Installation of current operating systems software, and utilities to include systems configuration, file, and hardware management. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): BCIS 110 OR C S 110 OR E T 120 OR E T 122 OR OECS 105. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

OECS 128 Operating Systems-Linux/Unix 3 cr.

Installation of current operating system software and utilities including systems configuration, file and hardware management. Prerequisite: BCIS 110, C S 110 or OECS 105. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

OECS 150 Introduction to Programming Using Visual Basic 4 cr.

Introduction to algorithmic problem-solving concepts, structured programming design-oriented application programming interface development. Solutions to problems are implemented using the Visual Basic programming language in the Windows environment, with connection to Access databases as applicable. Prerequisite(s): C S 110, OECS 220, and MATH 120. Restricted to: Community College campuses only.

OECS 185 PC Maintenance and Selection I 1-3 cr.

Selecting, installing, configuring, troubleshooting, and maintaining microcomputers and peripheral devices. Prerequisites: BCIS 110, C S 110 or OECS 105.

OECS 195 Java Programming I 1-3 cr.

Developing of skills in programming business systems using the computer language Java. Prerequisite: one semester of any programming course. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

OECS 203 UNIX Operating System 1-3 cr.

Introduction to the UNIX operating system using Telnet to access a remote UNIX system. Basic UNIX commands and file system concepts. Prerequisite: C S 110, BCIS 110 or OECS 105.

OECS 204 Linux Operating System 1-3 cr.

Install and configure the Linux operating system on X86 systems. Covers issues involved in maintaining operating system, networking, creating and managing users, and installing and updating software. General procedures for working with operating system includes maintaining disk space, preserving system security, and other related topics. Prerequisite: C S 110, BCIS 110 or OECS 105.

OECS 207 Windows 1-3 cr.

Windows concepts including program manager, icons, multiple applications and file/disk management. Windows applications introduced. Prerequisites: OECS 105 or BCIS 110 or C S 110 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits under different subtitles listed in the Schedule of Classes.

OECS 208 Internet Applications 1-3 cr.

Survey of the Internet to include e-mail, file transfer, current search techniques, the World Wide Web and basic Web page development. Prerequisite: C S 110, BCIS 110 or OECS 105 . May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

OECS 209 Computer Graphic Arts 1-3 cr.

Basic graphics composition using computer programs to include editing and manipulating graphic images, clip-art, and printing of pictures. Prerequisite: OECS 105, C S 110, or OECS 101. May be repeated for maximum of 6 credits under different subtitles listed in the Schedule of Classes.

OECS 210 Survey of Current Microcomputer Software 3 cr.

Overview of current software packages for the microcomputer. Prerequisite: C S 110, BCIS 110 or OECS 105.

OECS 211 Word Processing Applications 1-3 cr.

Basic word processing to include composing, editing, formatting, and printing of documents. Prerequisites: C S 110, BCIS 110 or OECS 105. May be repeated under different subtitles listed in the Schedule of Classes for a maximum of 6 credits

OECS 212. Introduction to the Automated Office 3 cr.

Covers applications of integrated business software packages. Same as BOT 210.

OECS 213 Image Processing 1 cr.

Introduction to digital imaging acquisition and editing. Use of digital cameras and computer graphic software for business and personal use. Prerequisite: C S 110, BCIS 110, or OECS 105. Graded S/U.

OECS 214 Creating a Web Page 1 cr.

Introduction to creating Web pages for business and personal use. Prerequisite: C S 110, BCIS 110 or OECS 105. Graded S/U.

OECS 215 Spreadsheet Applications 1-3 cr.

Use of spreadsheets to include graphics and business applications. Prerequisites: C S 110, BCIS 110 or OECS 105. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

OECS 216 Programming for the Web 3 cr.

Designing web-based applications using HTML and Java, Perl and C programming languages. Prerequisite: one semester of any programming course.

OECS 220 Database Application and Design 1-3 cr.

Creating, sorting, and searching of single and multifile databases to include report generation and programming database commands. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits under different subtitles listed in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite(s): C S 110 OR BCIS 110 or E T 120 OR E T 122 or OECS 105. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

OECS 221 Cooperative Experience I 1-3 cr.

Student employed at approved work site; supervised and rated by employer and instructor. Each credit requires specified number of hours of on-the-job work experience. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Restricted to OECS majors. Graded S/U.

OECS 222 Cooperative Experience II 1-3 cr.

Continuation of OECS 221. Each credit requires specified number of hours of on-the-job work experience. Prerequisite: OECS 221 consent of instructor. Restricted to OECS majors. Graded S/U.

OECS 245 Game Programming I 3 cr.

Development of programming skills for games and animation using current programming languages and tools. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

OECS 246 Game Programming II 3 cr.

Continuation of OECS 245. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: OECS 245.

OECS 255 Special Topics 1-4 cr.

Topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

OECS 260 Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) 1-3 cr.

Coverage of HTML as used for web-page development for Internet and Intranet. Text manipulation, graphics, hypertext links, lists, and tables. Prerequisite: C S 110, BCIS 110, or OECS 105. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

OECS 290 Computer Technology Capstone 1-3 cr.

Refines skills learned in the OECS program. Culminates in a review and practice of advanced software applications. Restricted to majors. Prerequisite(s): (OECS 125 OR OECS 203) AND (OECS 185 OR E T 283). Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

Paramedic-Occupational Education

OEEM 101 CPR for the Health Care Professional 1 cr.

Students learn identification and response to airway and circulation emergencies, including use of a SAED and accessing the EMS system. This course is taught using the American Heart Association guidelines for course completion. Required: grade of C or better.

OEEM 102 CPR for the Health Care Professional – Renewal Course 1 cr.

A comprehensive review of the CPR course for those who are already certified at the professional level. Includes the American Heart Association requirements for CPR course completion renewal. Prerequisite: OEEM 101 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for unlimited credit. Requires a C or better to pass.

OEEM 106 Advanced First Aid 2 cr.

Theory and advanced first aid skills taught emphasizing recognition and providing care for injury or sudden illness until professional medical help arrives. Course meets and/or exceeds the Red Cross or National Safety Council standards. Corequisite: OEEM 101 or consent of instructor.

OEEM 115 First Responder Prehospital Professional 3 cr. (2+3P)

Provides training in prehospital medical and traumatic emergencies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Corequisite: OEEM 101. Requires a C or better to pass. Restricted to majors.

OEEM 116 Emergency Medical Technician Bridge 5 cr. (3+6P)

Enhanced skill instruction and didactic integration designed to meet the requirements for an EMT-Basic certificate. Prerequisites: OEEM 101 and OEEM 115, and consent of instructor. Corequisite: OEEM 121. Requires a C or better to pass. Restricted to majors.

OEEM 120 Emergency Medical Technician Basic 6 cr.

Covers EMT-Basic skills instruction to include care of soft tissue and muscular/skeletal injuries, circulatory, nervous, general medical and respiratory systems emergencies. Corequisites: OEEM 101, OEEM 120L, and OEEM 121, or consent of instructor. Requires a C or better to pass.

OEEM 120L Emergency Medical Technician-Basic Lab 2 cr. (6P)

EMT-Basic skills development with emphasis on assessment, skills competency, and team-work in patient care in the prehospital setting. Corequisites: OEEM 101 or OEEM 120, and OEEM 121, or consent of instructor. Requires a C or better to pass.

OEEM 121 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic Field/Clinical 1 cr. (3P)

Covers the patient care experience provided through assigned shifts in the hospital and/or ambulance setting. Corequisites: OEEM 101, OEEM 120, and OEEM 120L, or consent of instructor. Requires a C or better to pass.

OEEM 122 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic Advanced Field/Internship 2 cr. (6P)

Expanded patient care experience provided through practical scenarios, assigned shifts in the hospital and/or ambulance setting. Prerequisite: current EMT-Basic license and consent of instructor. Requires a C or better to pass.

OEEM 127 Emergency Medical Technician Basic Refresher 2 cr.

Comprehensive review of prehospital emergency medicine for the EMT-Basic. New material relevant to recertification of the New Mexico EMT-Basic licensure included. S/U only.

OEEM 150 Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate 5 cr.

Theory of the roles, responsibilities, and scope of practice of the EMT-Intermediate. Assessment and management of respiratory, cardiac, trauma, environmental, behavior, reproduction, and childhood emergencies. Prerequisites: current EMT-Basic license, pretest, and consent of instructor. Corequisites: OEEM 150L and OEEM 151. Requires a C or better to pass.

OEEM 150L Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate Lab 2 cr. (6P)

EMT-Intermediate skills development with an emphasis on assessment, skills competency, and teamwork in patient care in the prehospital setting. Requires a C or better to pass. Corequisite(s): OEEM 150 and OEEM 151. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

OEEM 151 Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate Field/Clinical 2 cr. (6P)

Patient care experience provided through assigned shifts in the hospital and/or ambulance setting. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Corequisite: OEEM 150 and OEEM 150L. Requires a C or better to pass.

OEEM 155 Special Topics 1-6 cr.

Specific topics to be listed in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.

OEEM 157 Emergency Medical Technician Intermediate Refresher 2 cr.

Comprehensive review of prehospital emergency medicine for the licensed EMT-Intermediate. New material relevant to recertification of the New Mexico EMT-Intermediate licensure included. Graded S/U.

OEEM 158 Emergency Medical Technician-Combination Refresher 2 cr.

A comprehensive review of prehospital medicine for the prehospital care provider from the first responder level through the EMT Intermediate. New material relevant to recertification of the New Mexico First Responder, EMT Basic and EMT Intermediate licensure included. Graded S/U.

OEEM 177 Emergency Medical Services Instructor 4 cr.

Theory of student learning, methodology, instructional components, evaluation, and course coordination for the EMS
profession. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Restricted to majors. Requires a C or better to pass.

OEEM 201 Human Pathophysiology 3 cr. (2+3P)

Overview of anatomy and physiology. Emphasis on human body pathophysiology including a medical illness component. Requires a C or better to pass. Prerequisite(s): OEEM 120. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

OEEM 206 Introduction to Advanced Prehospital Care 3 cr. (2+3P)

Overview of prehospital care including roles and responsibilities of EMT-P, EMS systems, medical, legal, ethical issues, stress management, medical terminology, medical report writing and communication. Includes ride-along with ambulance and dispatch observation. Requires a C or better to pass. Restricted to majors. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): OEEM 120. Restricted to Community Colleges only. Restricted to OEEM majors.

OEEM 247 Emergency Medical Technician – Paramedic Refresher 2 cr. (1+3P)

A comprehensive review of prehospital emergency medicine for the EMT Paramedic. New material relevant to recertification of the New Mexico and Nationally Registered Paramedic licensure. Graded S/U.

OEEM 290 Independent Study 1-3 cr.

Individual studies directed by a consenting faculty member and prior approval of the department head. Prerequisite: OEEM 150 and consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Requires a C or better to pass.

Electrical Trades – Occupational Education

OEET 151 Electrical Apprenticeship I 6 cr.

Apprenticeship responsibilities and benefits as well as first aid and CPR will be covered. Hand tools, electrical theory, and the regulations imposed by national codes and OSHA. Students will apply theory taught in their jobs. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

OEET 152 Electrical Apprenticeship II 6 cr.

OHM’s law circuit sizing and service panel sizing will be covered in detail. Other topics include low voltage systems, heating and air conditioning circuits, alarm systems and smoke detectors. Prerequisites: OEET 151 and consent of instructor.

OEET 153 Electrical Apprenticeship III 6 cr.

Various electrical measuring devices will be covered in detail. Inductance, transformers, capacitance, and simple motors will be studies. Prerequisite: OEET 152 and consent of instructor.

OEET 154 Electrical Apprenticeship IV 6 cr.

Theory and application of three-phase transformers and autotransformers. Electrical distribution using switchboards, panelboards, and circuit breakers. Prerequisites: OEET 153 and consent of instructor.

OEET 251 Electrical Apprenticeship V 6 cr.

Commercial/industrial applications for electricians. Blueprint interpretation, commercial construction types and processes, wiring methods, wiring materials, and motor controls. Prerequisites: OEET 154 and consent of instructor.

OEET 252 Electrical Apprenticeship VI 6 cr.

In-depth commercial applications to include commercial/industrial service calculations, mobile home parks, multi-family dwellings, and commercial fire/security systems. Prerequisites: OEET 251 and consent of instructor.

OEET 253 Electrical Apprenticeship VII 6 cr.

Control devices in commercial/industrial applications; emphasis on logic in-line diagrams, time delay starters, reversing starters, and manual/magnetic solenoids. Prerequisites: OEET 252 and consent of instructor.

OEET 254 Electrical Apprenticeship VIII 6 cr.

Miscellaneous topics for the journeyperson electrician to include power distribution/transmission, solid state controls and relays, photoelectric and proximity controls and programmable controllers. Prerequisites: OEET 253 and consent of instructor.

Health Occupations-Occupational Education

OEHO 100 Applied Human Biology 3 cr. (2+2P)

Designed for pre-allied health students to explore the fundamentals of human biology, physiology functions.

OEHO 120 Medical Terminology 3 cr.

Study of medical terminology as it relates to understanding diseases, their causes and effects, and the terminology used by the medical specialties. Stress is placed on medical terms, their use, spelling, English translation, and pronunciation. Same as NURS 150 and BOT 150.

OEHO 140 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology 4 cr. (3+3P)

Essentials of anatomy and physiology for those considering a career in health as well as those interested in understanding their own body and the basics of health.

Photographic Trades-Occupational Education

OEPT 100 Photographics I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Covers basic black and white photographic techniques. Emphasizes black and white film and paper handling, film processing, proof printing, projection print, and print finishing. Adjustable camera required. Same as ART 270.

OEPT 101 Photographics II 3 cr. (2+2p)

Black and white film exposure control. Application of copying techniques, recognition of light values, and basic lighting techniques. Exposure, developing, printing, and finishing. Prerequisite: OEPT 100.

OEPT 120 Photo Finishing and Presentation 2 cr. (1+2P)

Use of visual language for personal expression. Freelance photography; care of original photos; preparation of portfolios, photographic markets, exhibitions and judging, galleries and copyrights. Students will prepare a photographic portfolio. Prerequisite(s): CMT 115. Restricted to Community Colleges only.

OEPT 150 Color Photography I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Color theory and principles, with emphasis on film, exposure, color balance, and filtration and digital output. Visual language of color products introduced. Work with positive film. Work with digital output using Adobe Photoshop. Prerequisite: OEPT 100 or consent of instructor. Restricted to: Alamogordo campus, Carlsbad campus, Dona Ana campus, Grants campus.

OEPT 155 Portraiture 3 cr. (2+2P)

Hands-on study of professional photography involving people. Studio and environmental portraits, fashion/glamour, and wedding photography. Studio and exterior lighting techniques, selecting lighting equipment, film and supplies. Prerequisite(s): ART or CMT 115. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

OEPT 190 Photographic Practicum I 2 cr. (1+2P)

Self-paced instruction to include production, display of work in a simulated self-employed situation. Students must record maintenance, cost expenditures, shooting records, and sequence boards for presentation. Prerequisite(s): OEPT 100 OR CMT 115. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

OEPT 192 Photocommunications 2 cr. (1+2P)

Human interest, events, documentation, publications, and advertising. Emphasis on equipment, darkroom writing, legal aspects, and visual communication skills. Prerequisite(s): CMT 115. Restricted to: Community Colleges only.

Physical Education

P E 102 Beginning Weight Training 1 cr.

Introduction to basic principles and techniques of weight training.

P E 112 Beginning Volleyball for Men 1 cr.

P E 113 Beginning Volleyball for Women 1 cr.

P E 114 Basketball for Women 1 cr.

P E 115 Basketball for Men 1 cr.

P E 128 Aerobic Dance 1 cr.

Designed to increase knowledge of the human body’s responses to exercise, enhance the level of muscular development, and cardiovascular endurance with the use of music.

P E 130 Beginning Swimming 1 cr.

P E 131 Aqua Aerobics 1 cr.

Designed to increase knowledge of the human body’s responses to exercise, enhance the level of muscular development, and cardiovascular endurance through exercise in water.

P E 150 Beginning Golf 1 cr.

P E 173 Running Fitness 1 cr.

Basic fitness knowledge techniques and training methods of fitness running are practiced and refined.

P E 202 Intermediate Weight Training 1 cr.

Intermediate training and skill techniques in weight lifting. Prerequisite: P E 102 or consent of the department head.

P E 205 Walking Fitness 1 cr.

Basic fitness knowledge techniques and training methods of fitness walking are practiced and refined.

P E 206 Beginning Physical Fitness 1 cr.

Progressive exposure to steady state exercise tailored to individual needs for the purpose of determining, improving, and maintaining physical fitness.

P E 212 Intermediate Volleyball-Men 1 cr.

Prerequisite: PE 112 or consent of department head.

P E 213 Intermediate Volleyball-Women 1 cr.

Prerequisite: PE 113 or consent of department head.

P E 228 Intermediate Aerobic Dance 1 cr.

Aerobic dance at a high intensity level with a more in-depth study of the body’s physiological response to exercise. Prerequisite: PE 128 or consent of instructor.

P E 250 Intermediate Golf 1 cr.

Prerequisite: PE 150 or consent of instructor.

P E 276 Intermediate Aqua Aerobics 1 cr.

A continuation of basic fitness to increase knowledge of the human body’s response to exercise, enhance the level of muscular development and cardiovascular endurance through exercise in water.

Philosophy

PHIL 101G The Art of Wondering 3 cr.

Introduction to some of the main problems of philosophy, with an emphasis on critical thinking. Philosophy conceived as an aid to living in this world with oneself and with others.

PHIL 136G The Quest for God 3 cr.

An effort to understand the religious life; a consideration of some of the traditional approaches to God and what it means to be religious.

PHIL 201G Introduction to Philosophy 3 cr.

Selected problems within the main branches of philosophy: metaphysics, theory of knowledge, ethics. Practice given in critical thinking.

PHIL 211G Informal Logic 3 cr.

Logical analysis of ordinary language, construction of definitions, argumentation, analysis of fallacious modes of thought and basic rhetorical considerations.

PHIL 223G Ethics 3 cr.

The philosophical explication of morality. Significant ethical systems developed in the history of Western thought.

PHIL 275 Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science 3 cr.

Introduction to the history and philosophy of science. Community Colleges only. Same as HIST 275.

Physics

PHYS 110G The Great Ideas of Physics 4 cr. (3+3P)

Conceptual, quantitative, and laboratory treatments of the great ideas and discoveries that have influenced lives and changed perceptions of nature, from Johannes Kepler’s laws of planetary motion and Isaac Newton’s and Albert Einstein’s laws of motion and gravity to the modern concepts of the quantal structure of nature and the big bang universe.

PHYS 211G General Physics I 3 cr.

Non-calculus treatment of mechanics, waves, sound, and heat. Knowledge of simple algebra and trigonometry is required.

PHYS 211GL General Physics I Laboratory 1 cr.

Laboratory experiments in topics associated with material presented in PHYS 211G or PHYS 221G. Students wishing to use the PHYS 211-212G or PHYS 221-222G sequence to satisfy the basic natural science General Education requirement must register for either PHYS 211GL or PHYS 212GL. Corequisite: PHYS 211G or PHYS 212G.

PHYS 212G General Physics II 3 cr.

Non-calculus treatment of electricity, magnetism, and light. Prerequisite: PHYS 211G or equivalent.

PHYS 212GL General Physics II Laboratory 1 cr.

Laboratory experiments in topics associated with material presented in PHYS 212G. Students wishing to use the PHYS 211G-212G or PHYS 221G-222G sequence to satisfy the basic natural science General Education requirement must register for either PHYS 211GL or PHYS 212GL. Corequisite: PHYS 212G or PHYS 222G.

PHYS 215 Engineering Physics I 3 cr.

Calculus-level treatment of kinematics, work and energy, particle dynamics, conservation principles, simple harmonic motion. Prerequisite: MATH 191G.

PHYS 215GL Engineering Physics I Laboratory 1 cr. (3P)

Laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in PHYS 215G. Corequisite: PHYS 215G. Students wishing to use the PHYS 215G-216G sequence to satisfy the basic natural science of general education requirement must register for either PHYS 215GL or PHYS 216GL.

PHYS 216G Engineering Physics II 3 cr.

A calculus-level treatment of topics in electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: MATH 192G and PHYS 215G.

PHYS 216GL Engineering Physics II Laboratory 1 cr. (3P)

Laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in PHYS 216G. Prerequisite: a C or better in PHYS 213L or PHYS 215GL. Corequisite: PHYS 216G. Students wishing to use the PHYS 215G-216 sequence to satisfy the basic natural science general education requirement must register for either PHYS 215GL or PHYS 216GL.

PHYS 290 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Paralegal Studies

PL S 160 Legal System for the Paralegal 3 cr.

Introduction to the court system, administrative agencies, functions of law offices, and professional conduct and legal ethics.

PL S 161 Legal Terminology 3 cr.

Survey of the language of the law that will serve either as an introductory course or as a review course to prepare students for the certification test.

PL S 165 The American Legal System 3 cr.

A study of the American judicial system with a focus on New Mexico’s judicial system; history of Anglo-American law, organization of the modern legal system, and trends in the legal profession.

PL S 180 Constitutional Law for the Paralegal 3 cr.

Case standing of the law of the Constitution and Bill of Rights with regard to day-to-day applications in the law practice. Documents dealing with constitutional problems in both civil and criminal areas of law will be drafted and discussed. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 190 Criminal Law for the Paralegal 3 cr.

Introduction to federal and state criminal law; criminal proceedings, prosecution and defense, sentencing and appeal. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 200 Legal Ethics for the Paralegal 2 cr.

Introduction to the ethical dilemmas faced in the workforce and the rules of ethics developed by the American Bar Association, various national paralegal organizations, and the Supreme Court of New Mexico.

PL S 201 Legal Office Procedures I 3 cr. (2+2P)

Same as BOT 201.

PL S 203 Immigration Law 3 cr.

Survey of the basics of immigration law including the rights and obligations of citizenship and the naturalization process. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 205 Legal and Ethical Issues for the Web 2 cr.

Legal, ethical, copyright, and privacy issues specific to the Internet.

PL S 212 Legal Office Procedures II 3 cr. (2+2P)

Same as BOT 212. Prerequisite: PL S 201.

PL S 221 Cooperative Experience I 2-4 cr.

Student employed in approved work site; supervised and rated by the employer and instructor. Each credit requires specified number of hours of on-the-job work experience. Prerequisite: PL S 274. Restricted to majors.

PL S 222 Cooperative Experience II 1-3 cr.

Continuation of PL S 221. Each credit requires a specified number of hours of on-the-job work experience. Prerequisite: PL S 221. Restricted to majors.

PL S 231 The Law of Commerce for the Paralegal 3 cr.

Law of agency, commercial paper, personal property, consumer rights. Student will study and draft documents relevant to these fields and consider their application and use in the routine law practice. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 255 Special Topics 1-4 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

PL S 264 Real Estate Law 3 cr.

Restricted to: Community College campuses only. Crosslisted with: BMGT 264.

PL S 270 Administrative Law for the Paralegal 3 cr.

A study of the substantive law, procedures, and forms involved in practice before governmental agencies including worker’s compensation, Social Security, employment security, and state and local administrations. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 274 Legal Research and Writing for the Paralegal I 3 cr.

Legal memoranda, briefs, and pleadings will be prepared and written based on the student’s original research. Research materials and techniques will be identified and studied; introduction of computer usage in legal research. Prerequisite: PL S 160 and ENGL 111G.

PL S 275 Tort and Insurance for the Paralegal 3 cr.

Primary legal principles of tort and insurance law and means of establishing insurance plans, types of torts and insurance, as well as use of specific forms and procedures relating to these areas. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 276 Wills, Trusts, and Probate for the Paralegal 3 cr.

Cases and statutes dealing with wills, trusts, and probate. Emphasis on preparation and drafting of documents and the application of the law and documents to the client’s problems. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 277 Family Law for the Paralegal 3 cr.

Methods of conducting client interviews and drafting of pleadings and research relative to families. Laws relating to marriage, divorce, custody, support, adoption, name change, guardianship, and paternity. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 278 Litigation for the Paralegal 3 cr.

The law of procedure and evidence will be considered through rules and cases. Case situations will be used to identify and solve problems. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 279 Legal Research and Writing for the Paralegal II 3 cr.

Continuation of PL S 274. Advanced training in legal research problems with a focus on analysis, writing, and preparation of sophisticated legal memoranda and documents. Prerequisite: PL S 274.

PL S 280 Interviewing and Investigation for the Paralegal 3 cr.

Techniques of legal interviewing and investigation with emphasis on development of human relations and communication skills. Prerequisite: PL S 160.

PL S 298 Independent Study 3 cr.

Individual studies directed by consenting faculty with prior approval by department head. Prerequisite: PL S 160. May be repeated for maximum of 6 credits. Restricted to majors.

Psychology

PSY 201G Introduction to Psychology 3 cr.

Methods and principles of behavior. Topics include human evolution and development, biopsychology, perception, learning, thinking, motivation, social interaction, and the diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behavior.

PSY 211 Introduction to Research 1 cr.

Introductory skills in library and on-line research. Emphasizes the scientific method including oral and written presentation of research according to the APA Style Handbook. Does not replace PSY 310 as requirement in B.A. degree. Community Colleges only.

PSY 266 Applied Psychology 3 cr.

Explanation of the psychological principles of everyday living. Emphasizes motivation, learning of intelligent behavior, and applications of psychology to social issues. Community Colleges only.

PSY 270 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Community Colleges only.

PSY 290 Psychology of Adjustment 3 cr.

Analyzes the responses people have to conflict, emotional stress, and frustration. It focuses on adapting to these problems and examines both normal and neurotic responses. Community Colleges only.

Social Work

S WK 221G Introduction to Social Welfare 3 cr.

A broad overview of current social problems and the role of social agencies and community members in addressing these problems.

Sociology

SOC 101G Introductory Sociology 3 cr.

Introduction to social theory, research, methods of analysis, contemporary issues in historical and cross-cultural contexts. Covers groups, deviance, inequality, family, gender, social change, and collective behavior.

SOC 201G Contemporary Social Problems 3 cr.

Introduction to the fundamentals of social analysis through the analysis of contemporary American social problems. Emphasis on methods of analysis and cross-national comparisons showing that the social problems studied are common to all societies. Covers racism, violence, poverty, crime, health care, and substance abuse.

SOC 248 Special Topics 1-3 cr.

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

SOC 258 Current Issues in Marriage and Family 3 cr.

Examination of contemporary American family life, including courtship, marriage, divorce, and child rearing. Community Colleges only.

SOC 262 Issues in Death and Dying 3 cr.

Major personal and social issues related to the process of dying in our culture. Community Colleges only.

SOC 263 Human Sexuality 3 cr.

Introduction to cultural and personal aspects of human intimacy, sexuality and the life cycle, sexual variation, and sexually transmitted diseases. Community Colleges only.

SOC 273 Sex and Gender 3 cr.

Analysis of changes, behaviors, and stereotypes of women and men in contemporary Western societies. Same as W S 273.

Spanish

SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish Conversation 3 cr.

Beginning conversation and intensive oral practice for non-degree seeking students and SPAN 111 and SPAN 112 students who desire additional conversational practice. This course does not count toward the NMSU second language requirement and is not open to native Spanish speakers without permission of instructor. Restricted to: Community colleges.

SPAN 111 Elementary Spanish I 4 cr.

Spanish for beginners. Not open to Spanish-speaking students except by consent of instructor. Prerequisite: language placement and assessment by departmental examination.

SPAN 112 Elementary Spanish II 4 cr.

Spanish for beginners. Not open to Spanish-speaking students except by consent of instructor. Prerequisite: language placement and assessment by departmental examination or C or better in SPAN 111.

SPAN 113 Spanish for Heritage Speakers I 3 cr.

Emphasis on development of heritage Spanish language skills learned at home and/or in the community. Covers listening comprehension, development of vocabulary and cultural activities to help strengthen heritage language and culture. Students who have previously earned a C or better SPAN 111 or SPAN 112 may not receive credit for this course.

SPAN 211 Intermediate Spanish I 3 cr.

Speaking, reading, and writing. Not open to Spanish-speaking students except by consent of instructor. Prerequisite: language placement and assessment by departmental examination or C or better in SPAN 112.

SPAN 212 Intermediate Spanish II 3 cr.

Speaking, reading, and writing. Not open to Spanish-speaking students except by consent of instructor. Prerequisite: language placement and assessment by departmental examination or C or better in SPAN 211.

SPAN 213 Spanish for Heritage Speakers II 3 cr.

Emphasis on development of heritage language skills learned at home and/or in the community. Covers speaking, writing, and vocabulary activities to build on existing knowledge of the language.

SPAN 214 Spanish for Heritage Speakers III 3 cr.

Continued development of heritage Spanish language skills learned at home and/or in the community. Emphasis on reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. Review of grammar points will also be stressed in preparation for upper level courses.

SPAN 250 Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking World 3 cr.

Familiarization with cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Language variations, history, literature, fine arts, and cultural behavior of mainstream Hispanic cultures including U.S. Prerequisite: either SPAN 111, SPAN 112, or SPAN 113.

Speech/English as a Second Language

SPCD 108 Intermediate ESL Listening and Speaking 3 cr.

Development of listening and speaking skills with attention to pronunciation. Emphasis on conversation and oral practice appropriate to an academic setting. Prerequisites: placement based on English language screening test, and either a minimum TOEFL score of 500 or consent of instructor. Graded S/U.

Statistics

STAT 251G Statistics for Business and the Behavioral Sciences 3 cr.

Techniques for describing and analyzing data; estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation; basic concepts of statistical inference. Prerequisite: MATH 120 (see note above). Same as A ST 251G.

Theatre Arts

THTR 101G The World of Theater 3 cr.

An appreciation class introducing the non-major to all aspects of theatre, including its history, literature and professionals. Students attend and report on stage productions.

THTR 105 Acting for Non-Majors 3 cr.

An introduction to basic performance techniques for non-majors.

THTR 115 Vocal Production for the Actor 3 cr.

Exploration and development of the actor’s vocal instrument, including relaxation, projection, diction and articulation.

THTR 130 The Art of Theatre 3 cr.

An introductory class for theatre majors covering the basic elements of campus theatrical endeavor and theory including overviews of theatre history, elements, artists, and literature. Also introduces the Theatre Arts major, faculty, and theatre resources available on campus.

THTR 141 Introduction to Stagecraft 3 cr.

Basic techniques used in the construction of scenery, props, and sound. Lab required. Pre/Corequisite(s): THTR 141L.

THTR 141L Stagecraft Lab 1 cr.

Class members will assist with construction for productions in a studio environment. Corequisite: THTR 141.

THTR 142 Introduction to Costume Crafts 3 cr.

A survey of all aspects of costuming a theatrical production. Basic construction, use of equipment, knowledge of available materials, dyeing, and millinery. No audits. Pre/Corequisite(s): THTR 142L.

THTR 142L Costume Craft Lab 1 cr.

Class members will assist in construction for productions in a studio environment. Pre/Corequisite(s): THTR 142.

THTR 149 Running Crew I 2 cr. (1+2P)

Students learn about backstage and front of house production positions and work on a technical aspect of a production in a rehearsal and performance environment. Graded: S/U.

THTR 203 Theatre History I 3 cr.

History of theatre and drama from ancient Greece to Shakespeare.

THTR 204 Theatre History II 3 cr.

History of theatre and drama from the Restoration to the modern day.

THTR 249 Running Crew I 1-2 cr.

Students work on a technical aspect of a production in a rehearsal and performance environment.

Women’s Studies

WS 201G Introduction to Women’s Studies 3 cr.

Analysis of the status of women in society today and history and consequences of gender stratification and inequality from the perspectives of sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science, and other sciences.

WS 202G Representing Women Across Cultures 3 cr.

Historical and critical examination of women’s contributions to the humanities, with emphasis on the issues of representation that have contributed to exclusion and marginalization of women and their achievements. Crosslisted with: HON 218.

WS 250 Special Topics 3 cr.

The topics of course will vary and will be indicated by subtitle. May be cross-listed with relevant course at the 200 level from any specific department. May be repeated under different subtitles.

Welding Technology

WELD 100 Structural Welding I 6 cr. (3+6P)

Development of basic skills in SMAW, OFC, and OFW in accordance with the AWS entry-level welder program.

WELD 101 Fundamentals of Welding 3 cr.

Set-up and adjustment of ARC and oxyacetylene equipment. Welding safety procedures and terminology. Skill development in laying weld beads with various patterns, positions, and processes.

WELD 102 Welding Fundamentals 3 cr. (2+2P)

Survey of welding and cutting processes for nonmajors. Classroom instruction and laboratory work with OFC/OFW, SMAW, GMAW, FCAW, and plasma arc cutting.

WELD 130 Introduction to GMAW MIG 3 cr. (2+2P)

Development of basic skills with gas metal arc welding (MIG) in accordance with AWS entry-level welder objectives. Wire electrodes, shielding/purge gases, and modes of metal transfer.